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These jokes remind me of school, we had a brilliant science teacher that used to send disruptive kids on quest to go get a 'long stand' from one of the other science teachers. Who were warned in advance and always happy to oblige and give the kid what they asked for.

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Hello All

               Thinking of school we had a technical drawing teacher (we had a nick name for him I am B****ed if I can remember it!)

But the point is if you forgot to show the fixings he used to say what are you going to do lad Spit on it and wait for it to rust?

Roger

ps I think we called him chalky?

Still a good point for all the cars we love?

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  • 2 years later...

Christmas is coming and tools as presents always a possibility.    A battery checker might be useful - I have three vehicles, and at least three old batteries that are used for checking wiring etc.     The best check of a battery that I know of is the load check, where you discharge it across a known resistance and see if the voltagae drops more than  it should.   The classic tester:

image.png.8b883ec18411242f0249f591a29abf06.png

works fine, but is very costly, £150 odd.     There are new style testers around that can cost £30ish

image.png.320cd906c9561223e998f6a4f118b7c9.png

and even tiny things  that cost a couple of quid:image.png.72825cb5394bf4b2a6e9dca79cd5eee9.png

 

Anyone have one of these cheaper versions of the tool? And can give an opinion of value for money?

John

Edited by JohnD
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The first two are big for a reason John - they have large robust resistances which pull an appreciable current from the battery which is why they are shielded as they will get hot.  

The third one is a bit of a joke.  Those weedy 5 Ohm 5 Watt resistors just won't pull enough current for a useful test.  Assuming they go in parallel that is 2.5 Ohms which on 12V pulls slightly less than 5 Amps.  Unfortunately, 5A on 12V is 60 Watts but the resistors are rated for 5 each, so they aren't going to last long. 

 

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Thank you Rob!   I included the last out of wonderment that it was possible.    It's clearly a kit, that you would have to make up yourself, with some sort of containment, and heat sink for the resistors?

Has anyone got one of the modern type?

John

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Most of the trade folks I know have the £30 version. Though some may have bought them from Snap-off at 4x the price.

My test method involves resting voltage an hour after being taken off charge (anything under 12.6v is suspect) and will it start the car easily.

The load testers as pictured (week, the first two anyway) only give a meaningful reading if the battery is close to full charge. If applied in a “fail to start” situation after lights have been left on or similar, the battery will inevitably fail the test but may actually be fine once charged. The AA/RAC patrols can be a bit naughty about flogging new batteries to the unwary rather than just giving them the jump they need.

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Don't know how accurate these testers are. Returned a big expensive battery correct amparage for my van twice to the suppliers. Their gadget ran a print out, everything fine, nothing wrong with it. As soon as the tempreture dropped it would struggle to turn over the diesel engine fast enough, and quickly go flat. New alternator etc. Out of warrenty now, convinced I bought a duff battery. 

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I use generally use battery voltage as a measure of condition on my GT6 and Honda S2000 and also use a Ctek charger.

The S2000 has a tiny battery (40Ah and 400ca) and gets drained rather quickly, I think by the alarm. Ultimately using it regularly is the answer. After a reluctance to  start, I did take the car to a battery/tyre shop and they checked it with one of those smaller testers, pronouncing it fine but with low charge. I now have a rechargeable lithium/iron jumper pack as a back up.

By comparison the 70Ah 600cA on the GT6 is a beast and spins the engine over just fine with a modern starter motor.

Ian

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