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Had a delve in my records!

The composite spring was uprated to match the stiffer front end and I went for 340 lb/in in the end (turns out this is pretty much GT6 Mk3 territory) with a reduced arch of 3/4".

Cost in 2005 was 290 US dollars - plus the dreaded import duty!

I also found my drawing of the modified uprights. Dated from before I even got the car so I was obviously thinking about this early on!

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Been working on making a new mould for the doorskins this last week or so and also decided to get serious about sooking up the dust from cutting the glassfibre - and eventually carbon fibre.

Creates lots of very fine dust which gets everywhere unless you have the vacuum cleaner on all the time and then it blocks the vacuum bags in no time at all. next thing you know the place is covered in dust.

After a bit of research on the web I went kind of nuclear with this one.

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From right to left

1. Extract hoses to the jigsaw and a collector hood

2. A cyclone separator which takes out the big bits and most of the small stuff and deposits it in the first blue bin

3. Water filter draws the air though water in the bottom of the drum and takes out pretty much everything else

4. The workshop vac which provides the sook and has a HEPA type filter to take out any remaining fine dust.

All joined up with 2" plumbing fittings, a selection of reducers and bits of ducting. Not exactly quiet but it does the job very effectively.

 

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Ah very interesting! Thanks :)

I was thinking about the composite leaf springs and how they might be used to combat one of the other issues with Spitfire/GT6 rear suspensions. It's less of an issue with swing axles, but the rotoflex rear end suffers from quite high roll centres as a result of the level upper link. If you could make a leaf spring that's pointed downwards a little at rest by de-arching the spring (so lowering the car by 3/4" or so without the need for a lowering block), you can move the roll centre downwards which helps with rear grip.

Will post some more of my findings on my thread rather than clutter this one up with rotoflex issues!

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6 hours ago, BiTurbo228 said:

I was thinking about the composite leaf springs and how they might be used to combat one of the other issues with Spitfire/GT6 rear suspensions. It's less of an issue with swing axles, but the rotoflex rear end suffers from quite high roll centres as a result of the level upper link. If you could make a leaf spring that's pointed downwards a little at rest by de-arching the spring (so lowering the car by 3/4" or so without the need for a lowering block), you can move the roll centre downwards which helps with rear grip.

Will post some more of my findings on my thread rather than clutter this one up with rotoflex issues!

Ah, I see what you're getting at with the geometry. Interesting to see where you get with that.

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Been busy working on the bodywork of the car over the last couple of weeks. Lots of preparation work but not a lot of visible progress all to get the fitting up of the doors and bonnet all sorted before I make the final mould sets for the carbon fibre panels.

I acquired a steel bonnet and a friend of mine gave me hand with his van to pick it up shortly before lockdown began

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There are quite a lot of new panels in there and it is generally in very good condition although it comes with plenty of minor dents and areas where repair panels have been let in. So still plenty to do.

However our son is back from university and with the help of him and my wife we managed to lift it onto the car this afternoon. It's a right heavy bugger compared to the old glassfibre bonnet and that's for sure. And awkward as there's not a lot of room to swing the thing in the garage with the car on the hoist.

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The wife's winter bike in the background along with some of my collection of bike wheels!

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It's never straightforward is it.

Spent the morning trying (unsuccessfully) to line up the bonnet left/right across the car before giving up and going off to attack the hedge (again).

Finally dawned on me that the inner arch was touching the air box!

The box was made to fit the space under the old glassfibre bonnet with a fag paper of room to spare. I didn't make that bonnet but obviously the inner arch on that one was slightly narrower than it should have been.

Does explain why the tyre would occasionally touch that side and not the other.

Bit annoying though as I will now need to make another air box to fit the new hole!!

Hey ho...

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Spent today fitting up the bonnet hinges so I could open it to remove the air box and square things up on the car. Took far longer than expected and then followed that up with a few hours of fairly physical panel alignment. Pretty much nothing to see from all that effort so I thought I would add a bit more to the back story of the rebuild.

When I originally rebuilt the car I cut off the off the outer ends of the front crossmember including the hinge brackets and replaced them with a very basic aluminium hinge arrangement that bolted directly onto the stub of the crossmember and the grille surround on the glassfibre bonnet.

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The front valance bolted directly to the bottom of the bonnet eliminating all the brackets for that as well.

Incidentally the duct tape on the oil filter is there to make sure the ring of magnets used to help catch metal particles don't get knocked off.

As part of the current rebuild I wanted to restore the original hinge and valance mount arrangement. Partly out of originality but also to give more clearance under the nose of the bonnet as my version rotates 'down' rather than 'up' as Triumph intended.

This involved replacing the whole front crossmember as the remaining bit had been bent and it was easier to get everything lined up rather than trying to scarf bits on the end.

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While I was at it I added some swaged holes. Saves a trivial amount of weight but looks cool. Blame BiTurbo for that as I copied him!

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I recovered the original hinge chassis brackets, derusted in citric acid. Realised then that without the diagonal cross member bracing pieces the crossmember is too floppy. I didn't have these bits and the available replacement sections are the Mk4/1500 version and quite expensive. So plan B was to make my own out of some 90 degree exhaust manifold bends that I had left over from making the V8 manifolds for the Scimitar.

Not only cheaper and lighter but look a bit 'technical' - and vaguely like the bracket mounts used on the Le Mans cars.

This lot was all welded together as a unit before welding to the car. I ran out of CO2/Argon for the MIG while welding the brackets onto the crossmember so finished off with pure CO2 hence the rather proud welds. Won't do that again.

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Then etch primed and painted

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Colin

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