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Covid 19, novel corona virus. Split from off-grid thread


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The success of the vaccination programme is clear, as more and more of the usual suspects here report either their jab or their appointment.     New Scientist's current issue has a series of articles reviewing aspects of progress on Covid, including:

"How to give your vaccine a boost" - Avoid stress, easy to say but make sure you get penty of sleep, use Zoom or videochat as a substitute for friendly/family chats (or of course keep posting here!), avoid excess alcohol (an occasional drink may improve response!), and take exercise.   It takes three to four weeks for the immune response to develop, so keep it up for a month.

Other articles include "How to tell if your vaccine worked",  a review of vaccines in the pipeline, including  a pill (!), a report from South Africa on their suspension of the Oxford AZ vaccine, and a main long article on how the hospital treatment of Covid infection has changed and improved.

I could mention that Vitamin D is not mentioned anywhere in the whole issue, but I won't because that would be just poking the bear with short stick.

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Well I’m still spamming because I think it’s important...... and this seems to bear it out Pity he takes half an hour when it needs 10 minutes tops but anyway..... Trial in a 

You'd think there was a conspiracy over that expression even 

Someone sent me this... Feels like we are straying into MMR territory here chaps. To be honest I can only cope with so many conspiracy theories at once before I have to run back to the

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The virus will evolve many different ways to circumvent vaccines. New variants of spike protein have been evolved in vitro  by expressing the varianr SP genes on yeast cells ( safer than making the virus!). One variant was found to bind to lung receptors 600-fold tighter than the original SARS-CoV-2.  With  the virus now endemic globally and only a minute fraction vaccinated, mass re-vaccinations will be needed for years to come. Rejigging a vaccine may be quick but mass re-vaccination is slow and cumbersome: the virus will always win the race.  At present we face jsut three variants but many more may arise simultaneously across the globe in naive populations, its those unknowns that are the threat. Most nations lack mass ssequencing technology so new dangerous variants can easily spread undetected,and then fly into Heathrow etc etc etc.

By failing to counter evolution with evolution public health authorities and most of the medical profession have allowed a pandemic to arise  and continue. Innate immunity has a 500 million year evolutionary history and will lyse viruses before they can replicate. But they deny us that defense by failing to recognise the central importnace pf physiological levells of D3 are needed to support innate immunity, as also evolved over 500m years. C-19 is iatrogenic, and the solution costs 2 p per day, is safe, simple to administer, and effective no matter what strain of virus coems our way.  Simples.  Peter

 

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And Facebook gets blamed for spreading 'fake news'!

What has happened is that a study has looked, in theory, at where the next coronavirus pandemic could come from.  In theory, because they used Artificial Intelligence to explore the genetics of humans and other mammals, looking for areas that such viruses could attack.     All valuable work.

But then, how is this  reported?    I swear that I didn't read it from its poxy pages, but the Daily Mail headlined this as, " WILL THE NEXT CORONA VIRUS COME FROM A HEDGEHOG? " 

Well, yes, but in a paragraph that is almost an afterthought, when the main finding is "The most prominent result for a SARS-CoV-2 recombination host is the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), having the most predicted associations of all included non-human mammals."    No mention of Porky in the Mail, which likes its bacon sarnies!

You can read Wardeh, Baylis & Blagrove's paper at: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-21034-5

 

 

 

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BBC News South, 6:30 and 10:30 pm tonight should carry an interview with Prof Singhal on using D3 in Weston-super-Mare hospital.

Prof Singhal is a clinical endocrinologist and President of BAPIO ( Brit Assoc Physicians of Indian Origin) who wrote to all members last April alerting them to risk of deficiency of D3 re C-19.

Peter

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4 hours ago, PeterC said:

BBC News South, 6:30 and 10:30 pm tonight should carry an interview with Prof Singhal on using D3 in Weston-super-Mare hospital.

Prof Singhal is a clinical endocrinologist and President of BAPIO ( Brit Assoc Physicians of Indian Origin) who wrote to all members last April alerting them to risk of deficiency of D3 re C-19.

Peter

Error BBC Points West 10:30 pm

or i-player at 6:00https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m000sfnt/points-west-evening-news-19022021

 

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Myself and Mrs SS had our first jabs early yesterday morning (Oxford AZ) and wow!, what a headache this morning!  Worthy of a drunken binge as a teenager....

Someone told me it is a good sign and that the vaccine is doing its job. Is this based on fact or just uninformed rubbish?

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It is, but it doesn't mean that your dose will work and someone else's who feels fine won't.

But see the New Scientist on "The 5 best things you can do to boost the chance of a vaccine working" : https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24933213-500-the-5-best-things-you-can-do-to-boost-the-chance-of-a-vaccine-working/#ixzz6nhF5QRB6

Briefly: 1/Avoid stress,    2/ Get plenty of sleep,   3/ Talk to friends and family, electronically if necessary,  4/ keep off the booze!  5/ Get plenty of exercise.   All good advice anyway!

JOhn

 

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Dunno. Seems to be a wide range of reactions ranging from a “slightly sore arm” and nowt else to a “very sore arm, thumping headache, sleeping poorly & mild flu-like symptoms”.

Pfizer and AZ seem about the same.

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Hello All

               But all is BETTER than the alternative! (tubes down the throat etc!)

I had headaches and shivers on and off for a couple of days but the Memsahib just once!

We had the Oxford one(but I would have taken what ever was offered as I believe these people Know what they are doing!)

Unlike all the Faceache etc group think they know better????????????????????????????????????????

Roger

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we had the Oxford, slightly sore arm and felt very tired for a day (didnt want to do anything**) apart from that all fine. When we booked we were able to book our second jab in May. 


**I spent the day watching a series of videos of some geeks reverse engineering and repairing an original Apollo unpotted guidance computer and got it running the original programs. Superb, 

mike

 

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For me it was the second dose of Sputnik V that really got me, the first was as expected just sore arm and tiredness. But the second had me with a bad 24-hour fever. Yet, I've not really heard anything about reactions to the second dose in the UK?

Not really sure why the second dose should be worse, I know for Sputnik the second vaccination is actually different, but still. Good thing I had it anyway, they won't give it to foreigners without residency permits now.

I wear a fitness tracker most of the time, and normally when I'm asleep my heart rate is around 45bpm, after my second dose it was mostly over 80bpm, which seems high for someone who is 26 and otherwise healthy...bpm.jpg.f41bfbd6934de28a3090cc08a3adb64c.jpg

P.S. What do you think the chances are of the NHS accepting this as proof of vaccination when I return to the UK?

part2.thumb.jpg.e531e72bcf21895f65a90a98d93e6e09.jpg

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Oh for goodness sake!    All you guys moaning about the awfully sore arm and really splitting headache your vaccine has given you, a vaccine that may have saved you from a horrible disease, that gives you weeks and sometimes months of debilitating illness and possible death.  Man up, the lot of you!  Be grateful to that wonderful science that has provided your  salvation only a year after the disease was unknown.    

I don't know, some people getting their vaccine (I think they must be blood donors) have asked about their cup of tea and a biscuit.  Dost thou think because thou art virtuous there shall be no more cakes and ale?

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

Oh for goodness sake!    All you guys moaning about the awfully sore arm and really splitting headache your vaccine has given you, a vaccine that may have saved you from a horrible disease, that gives you weeks and sometimes months of debilitating illness and possible death.  Man up, the lot of you!  Be grateful to that wonderful science that has provided your  salvation only a year after the disease was unknown.    

I don't know, some people getting their vaccine (I think they must be blood donors) have asked about their cup of tea and a biscuit.  Dost thou think because thou art virtuous there shall be no more cakes and ale?

Last time I gave blood, between chistmas and new year, I was the very last "victim" of the day. However, for the first time ever there was a Kitcat available with my cuppa. And when that was gone, the lovely lady in charge of refreshments offered me an orange club. Usually I donate late afternoon, and by then it is a broken bourbon or custard cream if you are lucky.

Anyway, I don't think anybody is having a real moan. It is just everybody is in "old git" mode and comparing ailments. I noticed it with my parents when they met their friends, they would always talk about their visits to te quack/hospital and what pills they were now on. Except my mum, who never had any idea what she was taking or why, but just did as she was told by the doctor.

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

Man up, the lot of you!

John I must pick you up on the use of that detestable modern phrase "man up". Like many recent imports it adds nothing useful to the lexicon. 'Grow up' is grammatically logical and serves the same function, without the anachronistic sexism. 

That aside, I don't think anyone was moaning :)

 

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From Dickens to Kipling, many author's characters have urged their correspondents to "be a man"!  Few , if any have been urged to 'Grow up".       I know what I meant and it did not include acquiring maturity, just masculinity.      Although I have to say, few women have complained in the same way as the moaning men!     Perhaps I should have urged the old gits to "Woman up!"

John

Edited by JohnD
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Pretty minor compared to the bloody cholera vaccine I used have every 6 months through my teenage years in order to keep my certificate up to date. That was a proper sore arm and armpit and feeling grotty for two days every time.

Nobody ever checked the bloody certificate..... and I discovered later that the vaccine had a very low protection rate too.

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You rock John!

I look forward to doing my bit with a sore arm, will tap into my English roots and whinge when it hurts, then tap into my stoic Scotch and Irish parts, man up, and get the fark over it.

Bring on the sore arm, sooner the better.  If it comes with a side of “I feel a bit crap, think I’ll take the day off”, then so be it.  This tiny inconsequential cog will be happy to be part of the restart of the wheels, and grateful to those supplying the grease...

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

From Dickens to Kipling, many author's characters have urged their correspondents to "be a man"!  Few , if any have been urged to 'Grow up".       I know what I meant and it did not include acquiring maturity, just masculinity.      Although I have to say, few women have complained in the same way as the moaning men!     Perhaps I should have urged the old gits to "Woman up!"

John

"Be a man" at least makes sense, "man up" is gibberish. 

Edit: but I accept that the sense is different from "grow up". Irrational irritation clouds my judgement!

Edited by PeteStupps
Mollification
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Don’t think anyone is seriously complaining here :smile:.

Vaccines are one of mankind’s great triumphs.

Find the deniers attitudes incomprehensible . Mind you, most of the same lot deny climate change, believe in imaginary beings and think the moon landings are a hoax.... so :confused:

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9 minutes ago, PeteStupps said:

“man up" is gibberish. 

American origin....... two nations separated by a common language :tongue:

With apologies to whomever it is I’m misquoting....

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