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mattius

Tool Protection?

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What do you guys use to protect tools from rust?

Previously i used leftover 20/50 mineral oil, but im wondering if there is something better...

Im talking about lathe, drill press etc

I know there is wax, but in my mind would that not pick up all the swarf?

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Hi Matt,

for long term storage a wax film is good but a pain to remove for frequent use.

Oil is not too clever as it will hold water.

Thin oily film on the tool then placed in a cupboard or draw with silica gel - shut the door.

 

Roger

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WD40 is pretty good.

No doubt others will disagree!

John

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I always used to use WD40, but it doesn't last. my lathe is used once every blue moon, and has started to get surface corrosion,

My old boy suggests gun oil...

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In so many ways WD40 is useless where any long term effect is required.

I do have a tin of it and apply to threads that are stiff - just to remove..

penetrating oil is for seized threads.

I suppose every garage must have a tin of WD40.

 

Roger

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Hmmmmmmmmmm!    I've had conversations about condensation in the garage, with people who have or are considering the expence of using a de-humidifyer.     I advocate ventilation, and offer as proof my location in Lancaster, one of the wettest places in the UK, when because (IMHO) my garage has poorly fitting doors that the wind rips through, I don't get condensation.      So maybe my admiration for WD40 is a result of that, once something is dry in there, it stays dry?

Because the cause of rust is like the Fire Triangle (Fuel, Oxygen, Ignition) except in place of ignition, you need water.

John

Edited by JohnD

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I don't have any problem with condensation or rust in my garage.
The garage was built about 10 years ago and I had it insulated while it was being built.  This means it easy to keep it warm and dry. I have a 1kW electrical oil radiator and then keeps it warm and dry. Probably helped by living in Cambridge which is very dry....
I have connected the heating system into our Honeywell Evohome room control system so I can program the temperature depending what I am doing. Works very well.
The problem with oiling tools and machine is the pain of cleaning it off. Not sure if oiled paper (not sure that's what it is called) and wrapping tools in it would work.

mike

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I built my garage 7 years ago, conventional construction of concrete base, brick walls (single skin) flat roof which I fibreglassed. No insulation at all.

First winter was very wet, and the only  issue was the SW facing wall actually let rain through, but it was driving rain. I panicked, but after a few dry days I applied a silicone cream (expected 20 year life) to that wall, no further issues.

The garage is never damp at all, and I have no rust issues on bare metal though I wouldn't expect that indefinitely.

I put the lack of damp down to ventilation. The space is rarely heated, if it is I use a couple of fan heaters. The other thing is I did put a DPM down despite the digger driver and concrete supplier both saying it isn't necessary with a garage. But if that wasn't there a damp floor could be bad news. And it coast about a tenner and took 10 mins to put down. Saying that, our house has concrete floors with no DPM, DPMs seemed to be installed post 1970's or suchlike.

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Glad to have some suppprt, Clive!     People seem wedded to their dehumidifiers, but then if they work, they work, but they are trying to dry out the World.

JOhn

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My experience with dehumidifiers is mixed. To work well the room/building has to be totally sealed with no change of air. 

Any significant air leaks and forget it, as you said, trying to dry the planet, plus much of the drying (in my case drying building work) will be down to the ventilation. 

I reckon a dehumidifier may have some use inside a car cockpit, or indeed a sealed bubble,  but they are not cheap to run and possibly offer no benefits over a few gaps....

(though when I have my heaters on in the garage I do put temp draftproofing up! but it comes off when I leave for the day so the warm/damp air escapes.)

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I've always used WD40 on bare metal. My Vitesse bonnet was in bare metal for probably 10 years in a lock up. Often find it covered in droplets of water from a leaky roof. Once every couple of months I'd give it another soaking of WD turning into a light brown coat. If I scratched it off you could see shiny metal underneath. Last year before spraying I used degreaser and a jet washer followed by a soaked thinners rag and brush to get into all the seams. No issues, looked like the day I stripped it. I think the key is to keep adding layers if stored for a long time.

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Lol i would be dehumidifying the world if i ran one in my garage, i rebuilt it this year, but its Scotland and the air is always moist...

Silca gel is interesting, i might cover them in plastic sheets with some silca gel.

The old garage was rotten and damp, im hoping to put it down to that.

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