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Thanks Kev, I am just trying to get all the aches an pains out of the way (nearly there) and tell my digestive system to behave. I think I underestimated the effects of the op on my aged bod

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If is frustrating, but on the flip side, better they found out now, than whilst doing the op. 

I had 7 operations cancelled, 2 whilst i was in scrubs minutes away from going, its gutting at the time but its always for the best reasons.

I actually found it helped slightly, as i was less worked up the next time i went in bizarrely.

Keep your chin up.

 

Having just been through this all with the other half, its a really strange time in the hospitals, they have to be extra careful everywhere, i totally got that, just infuriating.

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Hi Matt,

I'm now left wondering what is wrong with my lungs.

I had pneumonia in 2007 and there must be scarring that can be seen on  radiography

I have fairly mild asthma

And get annoyed with hay fever.

Fingers crossed

 

Roger

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Roger,

Ask for a telephone consultation with your GP, so you can ask them.   In the epidemic, teleappointments are now routine - maybe for the future as well!

Say why, so that they will have the report from the hospital before the appointment.

John

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The pandemic gave the NHS a kick up the ass to join the modern world. Telemedicine and being able to video conference with a GP or Hospital consultant is long overdue! Thankfully they've done a really good job on it.

Try not to get too concerned, a lot of things show up in CT scans, my brother in law still ridicules me for seeing my dangly bits in my CT scan!

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Incidentalomas..... the unexpected artifact on your scan. Can be the lucky find that saves your life, something that gives you a worrying few days until proven innocent or, rarely, just plain bad news. Certainly gets your attention when your consultant casually mentions that there are a couple of “points of interest” shown up in your liver......

Suspect this is a form of COVID screening (I haven’t had chest scans prior to either of my adult ops) and as you say, historical scarring has shown up.

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11 hours ago, Nick Jones said:

Incidentalomas..... the unexpected artifact on your scan. Can be the lucky find that saves your life, something that gives you a worrying few days until proven innocent or, rarely, just plain bad news. Certainly gets your attention when your consultant casually mentions that there are a couple of “points of interest” shown up in your liver......

Suspect this is a form of COVID screening (I haven’t had chest scans prior to either of my adult ops) and as you say, historical scarring has shown up.

Yes, it was a Covid screening scan.

 

As for Matt's dangly bits showing up on my chest scan !!! :blink:

 

Roger

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Folks,

so as not to put the jinx on my prostate op date I have kept it quiet,

Anyway the big day was last Tuesday 7th July.  I could feel that it was definitely going to happen then as phones calls, paperwork etc etc became more frantic.

I presented myself at Charring cross hospital at 7am and  by 9am I was on the surgeons table and chatting to the anaesthetist.

I spent from 1pm to 6pm in the recovery room waiting for a bed to become available - the previous patient was waiting for his med's.

No body told me about the pain. I was expecting something in my abdomen area but my shoulders were screaming. I couldn't use my arms to position myself in bed.

Wednesday started good but I became very tired quiet quickly - probably lack of decent sleep.  The Consultant popped in all bright and breezy and seemed to think being run over

by a tractor was par for the course. The shoulder ache is pretty standard apparently.

It is now day three after the op and I am definitely feeling better but a long way to go yet.

Isn't it odd how small things give you pleasure. I started to pass wing yesterday afternoon and it was heaven. Until then I looked like a bloated pig. Now I just look like a pig.

I sincerely hope that I do not have any more prostates that need removing.

 

Roger

 

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Great news Roger and yes, it will take time - longer than you think I suspect to get fit again.  I saw you comment on another site about doing some work on the gearbox shortly after a forthcoming op and had a little knowing smile! Your body will expending huge amounts of energy repairing itself and ahem , we are not as young as we think we are!

For what it is worth going for a short walk everyday and going a bit further is a good start. I couldn't manage more than 100 yards initially. 15 weeks later I went skiing for 3 days. Controlled progress - just don't try and force it. 

Miles

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Well, good news it’s done. Shoulder pain.... oh yeah. I felt like someone had stuck a spear through me. Apparently it’s referred pain from lower down caused by being blown up with CO2 to give more operating room. Farting becomes blessed relief as you say.

You should be starting to feel more human by day 3 but it’s very variable. One of my friends was wanting to stop at the pub on way home from the hospital barely 48 hours after the op (nurse wife said no!). I took months (well documented already really hope you don’t go there!)

Hopefully your catheter bag is nice and clear now.....

Wish you a speedy and complete recovery!

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Ah!  Thnak you, Nick!  I was a bit worried!        That shoulder pain is "referred pain" because the lower surface of the diaphragm is irritated by something.     The major nerve to the diaphragm is the "Phrenic nerve" that is almost entirely motor - it supplies the the diaphragm muscle - but has some nerve fibres that are sensory, and for reasons to do with evolution and the way the body develops as a foetus, those sensory fibres go to the shoulders!   Yes, the gods were engineers but they had to make do with what they started with, which was fish!      So you don't feel the pain where the irritation is but where the fibres go to.

CO2 dissolves in water, and peritoneal fluid, to make carbonic acid and any acid is an irritant.    I was worried' 'coz I didn't think of the CO2 that Nick reminded me of, that is used to give the surgeon space inside the abdomen to work endoscopically (laproscopically!).     The other thing that can cause such pain is blood, free in the peritoneum, which wouldn't be a good thing!

John

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Thanks for the extra info John. Bloody hurts I can tell you and is rather unexpected (the location anyway).

As it turned out I did have rather a lot of blood loose in my peritoneal cavity, but didn’t know that at the time.....

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I can vouch for he shoulder pain.

Not only was it painful but it stopped you using that arm to raise your body from the bed. I was like an upside down tortoise.

No blood loss. The consultant was very happy with the result.

 

Roger

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On 7/11/2020 at 8:14 AM, RogerH said:

I can vouch for he shoulder pain.

Not only was it painful but it stopped you using that arm to raise your body from the bed. I was like an upside down tortoise.

No blood loss. The consultant was very happy with the result.

 

Roger

Hi Roger

I hope you have a speedy and successful recovery.

All the very best.

Kev.

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Thanks Kev,

I am just trying to get all the aches an pains out of the way (nearly there) and tell my digestive system to behave.

I think I underestimated the effects of the op on my aged body.  It will take a coupe of weeks to become normal(ish)  But at least I am on the mend with no issues. Lucky me.

 

Roger

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It’s a major op and takes it toll even if all goes smoothly. Don’t overdo it.......

Presumably you are still running some external plumbing?  Due out this week (10 days) or next (14 days)? Fashions seem to vary. Either infinitely preferable to 28 days!

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Today I had to pop into the hospital to have the catheter removed from Percy.

For some unknown reason I was not looking forward to it.

However it was completely pin free - phew!!!

I then spent the next 2+ hours drinking water, weeing it out and being measured.  I asked the question 'if you want my bladder empty before I can leave why do I have to drink water'

Doh!!!

 

Next stop in three weeks is to have a follow up with the consultant.

 

Roger

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I’m sure they explained it, but they want to check you can empty your bladder as not being too is very bad and recatheterising someone who recently had an RP is high risk and should only be done by someone who knows what they are doing.

I expect you also had an ultrasound to check you could completely empty it?

Trust all continues to work smoothly and the tap continues to turn on and off as instructed without too much dripping.....

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Most unpleasant SI I ever had was am MRI of my kidneys.   They wnated the urinary tract dilated, so I had to drink 2 litres of fluid (my choice!) and lie on my back whil eht machine chuntered, THEN LIE ON MY FRONT while it did itagain.   I nearly Alan Shepherded  myself!

 

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