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JohnD

Any 'born-again' skiers?

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I haven't been skiing for thirty years;  never more than a smoothslope skier, no black-runner me, but I enjoyed it!

Now, I'm invited on a family skiing holiday, next winter.    Anyone else become a 'born-again' skier?     Apart from the fitness aspect (I've looked up the exercises) I plan to take myself to "Chill Factore" the artificial snow ski slope in Manchester, and perhaps a lesson or two.     But since I last skied these 'snowboard' devices have been invented.     Any views?       I note some research that says that skiers get fewer injuries but you are less likely to kill yourself on a snowboard!

John

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John, snowboards generally for the young. They are always falling over, sitting down, getting up and the learning seems a nightmare. 

Skiers probably get more knee injuries, snowboarders tend to be like lemmings jumping off everything. 

Just get your fitness up, especially those legs. And enjoy some nice "motorway" blues. My favourite. Black's are hard work!

Where are you heading to?

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As an ooold skier and ski patroller most injuries are broken tib and fib...lower leg spiral fractures. Something to do with that 6 foot lever attached to your foot. :stupid:

Tony.

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Never felt the urge for a broken bone or two strongly enough to try skiing......

Also, having spent quite a bit of time on the sides of Alps in the summer, I’ve experienced how steep some of the runs are.....:blink: Even the down-hill MTB loonies won’t ride down them!

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John

I dusted off my skis again when our nippers started learning, at the beginning of primary school.  And discovered that it is not like riding a bike - you do forget.

I discovered that I'd lost flexibility in my right ankle, which I put a lot of effort into regaining, to little effect.  So I could carve to the right with some skill, but turning left remained a bit of a struggle.  Needless to say, all the impact bruising appeared on my right buttock...

When both cadets surpassed me, about six years ago, I'm afraid that I gave up again.  The final straw was the film my wife took of me at the end of a red run, knees locked tightly together, looking like Chubby Checker doing The Twist.  Half way through this shameful footage, the camera is starts shaking as her giggle turns into uncontrolled laughter.  I know when I'm beat.

Paul

 

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If you've the feel to tip toe a car on the edge of adhesion through a chicane - you can probably pick up skiing quiet quickly..its all about balance - weighting & unweighting
... the trick is to lean out and down, to compress and then un weight the ski, ...to drive the turn with your big toe and shin
... modern short waisted skis make turning so much easier than it used to be .... it's great fun and a lunch time schnapps helps ease the afternoon aches & pains... Go for it!

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I used to ski at school and then when this new fangled snowboarding thing happened jumped right into it, i learned to snowboard with ski boots and bindings on a snowboard (it is near impossible, you can't snowboard in rigid boots!) When the proper gear filtered through i mastered it and we used to do a holiday here every year and then one across to various locations in the alps.

As much as its a bit of a cliche, snowboarding is really for the younger, it requires a lot of strength and flexibility in the ankles and calf muscles not to mention good body rotation in the hips. All of which leaves you as you get older, despite my youth i'm including my broken body in this age bracket.

Where you heading?

Avoid any thoughts of dry slopes, you learn nothing, (and more than likely will break a thumb) the indoor snow dome ones are good, but usually too short, i'd really recommend getting a refresher lesson across there, the instructors on the resorts are usually incredible and even an hour will not only give you confidence but help you learn the different type of snow.

Get yourself a decent set of goggles before you go (double glazed are a revelation and so worth the money, they don't mist up), a mirrored lens is usually the lens i use, snowblindness is a thing and can be as painful as arc eye.

Biggest thing for skiing is make sure your boots fit, spend time making sure they are going to be comfy (if you have your own, get the liners remoulded), bad fitting boots will have you hobbling around within hours and potentially more damage, i've seen it all from damaged ligaments to broken toes.

Oh and your bindings, make sure they are adjusted properly, too tight and you will injure yourself, too loose and you will be running down the slope after your ski, we've all been there!

Biggest thing, enjoy the apres ski! its an absolute ball, a nice vin chaude halfway down the slope will get you going and keep your body nice and relaxed should you fall :P

Edited by mattius

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oh and the coolest thing i've seen in many a year, piste map lens cloth, brilliant idea, always have a map on you, getting lost is never fun especially in a whiteout.

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John,

You also need to practice serious drinking before you go, Après Ski can be a shock to the system.

Alan

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Alan,

I reshent that shlur!    I am already a well bracticed thinker, and not as thunk as you drink I am.

But all that practice takes time, which is why I need to refresh my piste skills.     My pissed skills are well refreshed.

And I am convinced by the above to eschew the snowboard, however great the buzz from a Backside Quad Cork 1980, compared to a Chateau Beychevelle St Julien 1980.     I'm now looking at a lesson at Chill Factore in Manchester (couldn't they spell 'factory'?) possibly sharing with Daughter who lives local and also feels the need for technique refreshment, although after a much shorter lay-off than mine.

Last one down buys the first round!

John

Edited by JohnD

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I learnt to ski at 23 (1990) and then didn't ski again until 2017. It's like riding a bike - you don't forget. I have since skied at every opportunity - the Sella Ronda in the Dolomites is simply a fantastic experience. Start on the easy stuff and build confidence.

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I learnt today that my family has such confidence in my past skills that I am already booked for Les Arcs 2000 in January!   And as a result some ski tuition next weekend.     But pissed skills?   I will be sharing  a room with Grandson No1, aged 5, so on best behaviour!    

Thanks, Family!

John

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On 9/13/2019 at 7:56 PM, JohnD said:

I haven't been skiing for thirty years;  never more than a smoothslope skier, no black-runner me, but I enjoyed it!

Now, I'm invited on a family skiing holiday, next winter.    Anyone else become a 'born-again' skier?     Apart from the fitness aspect (I've looked up the exercises) I plan to take myself to "Chill Factore" the artificial snow ski slope in Manchester, and perhaps a lesson or two.     But since I last skied these 'snowboard' devices have been invented.     Any views?       I note some research that says that skiers get fewer injuries but you are less likely to kill yourself on a snowboard!

John

Hi John

I am a reborn skier - I did a fair bit of skiing when I was a kid. After I moved away from my parents (and had to pay for my own vacations) skiing was not really an option. Fast forward twentysome years I found myself in a situation where skiing suddenly became an option, and I have been skiing once or twice every year for the last 7 years. 

Like Paul mentions,, it is quite like riding a bike, when I reattached the skies it was easy. Just take it very easy on the first few days. Go slow - and it would be a great idea to hire an instructor for a few hours just to get back in practice.

Most important - training before you leave. Don't waste your time on indoor slopes etc. Just make sure your legs are strong, if you have a balance board then use it. In general find all the training videos and do some exercise.

Stay away from the snowboards - they are for the young ones who are determined to look foolish and not use a proper pair of skies.  

You will find that modern skis are much easier to ride than the things we used back in the 80'ties. Go for some shorter skis than you are supposed to - shorter skis are slower but easier to navigate and will not wear you out on the first day.  Rent a helmet !

Best advise is to get up early in the morning and get skiing before all the young ones arrives. On the first days yo cannot really expect more than 3 or 4 hours on ski before you are knackered. So get up, use the piste while it is fresh and well-prepped. 

After 12 o'clock the young snowboarders are awake and terrorizes the piste. After 2 PM the Russians are well pissed, and you really do not want to be run over by 24 stone drunk Russian on snowboard. So keep an eye out for people behind you - most likely they are out of control :-)

Enjoy

Cheers

Nick

 

 

 

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When my eldest daughter was born, a wise older friend said 'teach your children to ski, and you will have family holidays for life'. He was right. Even with different abilities, scenic softies will mix with the black tun burners, in wonderful locations, coming together over lunch and dinner to eat and drink well and exchange war stories, whatever their ability (and even if they are only walkers). 

Do it John. Take it easy. Enjoy the scenery and the company.

Miles

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A side effect report!

I was looking at ski clothes online, and thinking I can 'do' without a lot of them by using clothes I already have - good rally jacket, trekking trousers (perhaps with a pair of long johns if its very cold), etc.     I noticed that the ski trousers advertised were worn with braces, and thought to try a pair I had in the drawer - bought years ago to wear with a hired Dress Suit that didn't fit very well!      Clipped them onto my trekkers, and   ....  Oh, the comfort!    

I suppose - I bloody know! - that I have no waist any more, so that I was drawing my belt tight to keep the trousers up, which isn't comfy.    Now I can sit, stand, drive and my trousers stay up, and I don't feel corsetted.    Of course, this provides a free range for more waist expansion, and braces are the ultimate Old Man thing, but what the hell!

John

 

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Remember the trousers need to fit over ski boots. And it can get VERY cold (depending on altitude and time of year)

My jacket gets used for all sorts, but a decent collar, and even a good are very useful.

I have one Decathlon salopettes that were about £15, and doing well. Padded to help insulate, and glad they do. Even at -20 I have not suffered. 

Good gloves, and with separate inners are essential. And I take it you will use a helmet? This year is the first year we have used helmets. First day another skier whose ego outstripped his skills managed to headbutt Gill while she was on the very edge of the piste catching her breath. Dread to think what would have happened without a helmet (other books was wearing one)

Decathlon is a good, sensibly priced place to buy some stuff if required. Or borrow? Layers are your friend for warmth, and unlike long sleeved t shirt type of things. Arms lose a lot of heat..

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As a racer I am a helmet, and other safety equipment, fan.    My junior family who have invited me with them, say that where we are going ski hire insist on a helmet too.     Michael Shumaker was wearing one when he had his ski accident, but he had a camera mounted on it.  The localised impact of that in his fall negated any helmet's capability.      Previously, I had asked the MSA (now "Motorposrt UK") if I might mount a camera on my race helmet.   I had in mind a Velcro mount, but their response was, "Under NO circumstances"!      I'm glad they said so now.

On other kit, I'll draw the line at an avalanche locator - I do NOT intend to go off piste!    But the kit of a devoted rallyist has a lot of similarities, when you face wind, rain and snow on the stages, while the competitors ponce about in nice warm rally cars!    As well as good jackets, gilets, gloves and trousers,  I have stuff for the more extreme, neck warmers from light buffs to thick fleece, long-sleeved Ts., lined trekking trousers, etc.      Walkers and rallyists have learnt the benefits of layering too!     Goggles, as mentioned, I'll need, and I think some mitts, as I won't need the finger dexterity that gloves give, and beta-blockade does impair finger blood flow!

And, glad you approve of "Decathlon"!     That is Daughter's favoured ski quartermaster, and we will be visting shortly, after another trip to Chill Factore for  some more real snow practise!

John

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I wasn't aware of the camera implications in Michael Schumacher's unfortunate accident.  Perhaps it's something that requires more publicity when you consider the number of cyclists/motorcyclists on the road with cameras attached.

At work we have been advised to remove site access pass lanyards when driving due to the risk of the airbag punching them through your chest!

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Do they advise removing shirt pocket pens, or anything else?    "Through" the chest is bit much - a localised indentation an d addirtional bruising, maybe.    An airbag release is a violent event - just google for "airbag bruises"!    But the alternative isn't worth thinking about.

Airbag vests have been developed for horse and bike riders, that inflate on losing the upright position, so just before any impact.    Skiers have the avalanche airbag, designed to 'float' them to the surface of the snowy wave, and protective vests, but they are very expensive, and not for me, as I shall not be ski racing and will be falling over quite a lot!

John

 

 

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I guess it depends how close you sit to the wheel.  I understand the 'learning' derived from an NHS employee who received serious chest injuries.

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Sneaked down to Trafford again today and had an hour on the slope.   YeeHA!  Cheap as chips midweek, and a lot more fun.

Its coming back!   Nearly parallel, need to work on forward weighting and carving.  But just an hour left me knackered.  Also need to work on fitness!

John

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