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JohnD

"Bent antiroll bars fitted by design"

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On the Triumph Vitesse International Fb page, https://www.facebook.com/groups/355145157954928/?fref=nf it is being said that "The twist is there by design, it was introduced very early in Herald production and was maintained until the end of production."

I  disagree - an ARB should be flat on the floor - but I'll be glad for other's views.

JOhn

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My only observation is that the thin ones I have are all bent, and the thick ones aren't, whilst it may just be that the thin ones just bend, there is something in my head that says that given that they should be free to rotate on the centre mountings a slight bit of torsional pretension would be good, however given that the ends are in the manky rubber connecting arms engineering excellence theory goes out the window. Let us know if you find the answer.  NB I would ignore info from anyone who has an after market ARB as I doubt very much that anyone would have bothered to replicate, and as I suspect there are a lot of those out there it may be hard to see the wood for the trees.

Alan

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At the TSSC stafford meet, probably 20 years or so ago, there was somebody with what they claimed (and no reason at the time to doubt the claim) were NOS anti roll bars. They all had an identical twist.

Of course, they may have been used, or a myriad of alternative explanations. But it does seem odd that they all seem to have a twist. But could it be, that just like some cars had a spacer on the top of the shock top pan, the twist is to help counteract the weight of a driver? Or am I being too simplistic?

Flat ARB is obvious really,but then if a car is properly coner weighted and set up, you may well need adjustable links for the ARB? I was popping the front suspension back on my (now repaired/reinforced)chassis front end just yesterday. And looked at the poxy ARB links.  Mine were NOS from when I built my Vitesse, so probably better than the new stuff today. But got me thinking. A rubber(poly) bush/eye for the end of the ARB, and a rod end setup to connect to the wishbone. A sort of Wolfitt-OE hybrid. I may just investigate that.

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As its an interesting topic, whilst stopping for a cup of coffee I did  a bit of Googling, and it would appear that its a topic that get touched upon upon many forum, and many marques of cars.  And it does appear to be one of lives fundamental questions Twisted or Not Twisted, with many opinions on both sides. My "opinion" after reading is that if you were setting up a racing car you wouldn't want twist and do all your adjustment on the drop links, if you had a production car without adjustable links and were looking for a design that would compensate for some inbuilt misalignment and also some use induced wear, a twist would take up any slack so rather than in neutral stance having a sloppy ARB it was always under minimal tension, then a twist would work.

As I say that is an opinion, and there are many different ones out there!

Alan

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Ah, the spacer over the spring!     Only in America, and I suspect an dealer fitted option, who would look at his customer and say to the workshop, "Hank, we gotta biggie.  Fit a spacer!"

John

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Maybe not to counter driver weight ( wrong for LHD cars) but to counter torque lifting of the right rear wheel. Applying power tends to lift the chassis on that side, especially if its none too stiff. Its big issue on drag racers who jack the suspension on that wheel to counter torque-lift

Peter

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Significant torque lift on a car with a production BHP of 98?

Top Fuel dragsters claim over 10 THOUSAND bhp and 7000ft-lbs of torque - they can torque lift!

 

Those ARB links have rubber bushes - same problem, if it was a problem.    Sphericals are the way to go!

JOhn

Edited by JohnD

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3 hours ago, JohnD said:

Significant torque lift on a car with a production BHP of 98?

Top Fuel dragsters claim over 10 THOUSAND bhp and 7000ft-lbs of torque - they can torque lift!

 

Those ARB links have rubber bushes - same problem, if it was a problem.    Sphericals are the way to go!

JOhn

 A floppy chassis would allow 98 hp to lift the right rear wheel. Easy experimental test, disconnect the arb.

Peter

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There was no 98 hp in '59 though.  Or even the 63 hp of the Mk1 Spit until '62..... 39 snorting horses from the early 1200 Herald.  Not a torque reaction wheel-lift risk in my book.....

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