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Graham

Air tool recommendations please

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Hi Guys 

Looking to purchase a 3" air cutoff wheel and an air finger sander in the new year as about to start a restoration on my TR5. I have a reasonable sized compressor 11FAD 150Ltr anybody have any recommendations on what tools to look at.

ATB Graham 

 

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Be warned cut off tools and sanders use LOTS of air. In my experience you will find in actuality that your cutoff tool stalls quite regularly as even a 150 litre compressor will be running behind it. Same with a finger sander, although not as badly. That is my experience on both a direct and belt driven 150litre compressor . 

If I were you (and I am you to a certain extent because I have tried both) you would be much better off buying electric ones .That is what I ended up doing. The sander you can sort of get away with, but the cutoff tool will drive you scatty, unless you can run big pressures. 10 bar on a 150 litre compressor and the cutoff tool will stall all the time and the compressor will be going from about 10 seconds in, and losing the battle to keep up. 150 litres are great for air chisels, impact stuff, jogglers etc but struggle with anything that needs a constant air delivery , such as cutoffs, grinders DA etc. 

Thats just my experience, using a Sealey cutoff with both a FIAC and SIP 150 single phase compressor at 10bar.

 

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Have to say that I'm also in the electric camp.  Have a B & D finger sander which is a very useful tool.  It wasn't expensive though the belts are quite pricey.  Not sure what you do about the cut off wheel if an angle grinder isn't acceptable as electric cut-off wheel tools don't seem to have made it across the Atlantic yet.

Another thing to watch with the air tools is that the higher flow tools will sometimes need more that than the cheapo regulators that get supplied with compressors can pass, giving the impression that the tool is completely gutless.

Nick

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The volume - eg 150 L - is only relevant as a buffer between the pumps capacity in Cubic Feet per Minute, CFM, and the demand by the tool in the same units.   This site includes a table of typical values for the latter: http://www.powermate.com/air_compressors/buying_guide.php

If the pump has a lesser CFM, then only a big volume reservoir will allow it to run for very long - and then take a long time to fill up again.     If 11FAD means 11CFM (?) then it's adequate.

How will you deliver the air to the tool?   I have several air tools - in order of use, least to most, jigsaw, finger sander, impact driver and most used, a die grinder - and I looked at various pipe systems to provide sockets around te garage/workshop.      Far, far cheaper was a retracting air hose reel, wall mounted centrally, which has worked well.

John

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Here is a useful link explaining difference between free air delivery and CFM . according to the link FAD is a third less than CFM ....

Cant say I understand it fully namely as it requires me to think about it!

https://www.airsupplies.co.uk/cfm-explained

John clearly is much more organised than me as I have 15mm pipe to a water trap then hoses thrown all over the garage floor.

Andy

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On 12/20/2018 at 12:03 PM, Graham said:

Hi Guys 

Looking to purchase a 3" air cutoff wheel and an air finger sander in the new year as about to start a restoration on my TR5. I have a reasonable sized compressor 11FAD 150Ltr anybody have any recommendations on what tools to look at.

ATB Graham 

 

Hi my daughter works for this outfit: https://www.airtoolservices.co.uk/ ... contact Craig Foy or Darren Proffitt - for advice 01772 557700

 

 

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At the NEC show last November I bought a Sealy pneumatic joggling tool. Up till then I had to do joggles by hand.

Not too bad for a short run but my boot lid repair sections ar apprx  a meter long.

The new gun does it effortlessly.  Not cheap but good.

 

Roger

 

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I recently bought an air saw (from aldi, about a tenner) which although will be used rarely, is fantastic when you can't get in any other way. A neat trick is to use your old hacksaw blades, OK, the ends which don't really get used. Chop them off with your grinder and clamp in the saw.

 

nick is accurate about the cheap regulators. I have a regulator, but also a direct from tank outlet. Makes a big difference with high air use tools. And Sam is spot on CP stuff is way better than the budget tools I own. But I am sorely tempted by a battery impact wrench. And I recently bought an electric die grinder (again lidl or aldi, not expensive and very good value for something that is not used much.)

A finger sander is on the list... but electric.

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Are you guys with air tools using in-line oilers?  The tools don't last very long without.

 

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Mine - most used is a die grinder - get a couple of squirts from my oil can into the air intake before use.

Blower, for dusting and drying doesn't count!

JOhn

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