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JohnD

What's happened here??

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Weirder and worryinger (?).   Still can't get the rig restarted.     It'll cough and sputter on "Startyabastard", so still a fuel problem and further dismantling finds that the carb needle has the green deposit on it!!

To attribute that to electrocorrosion, between the brass (?) needle and  a copper tube in the tank seems stretched.

John

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John, ethanol takes water into suspension. 

If there is ethanol fuel in the carb when it’s left to stand, you will get corrosion.

E5 is bad enough, but E10 will be death for anything steel abd brass, so a future of no steel copper based metals in our fuel systems awaits.

lay up fuel, (expensive £5 / litre ethanol free stuff), awaits us.

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I've cleaned out the float chambers, had the jets out and the pistons and needles (that's when I found the green again) but still they won't flow fuel.    It'll run briefly on the starter spray, which proves the point.   B*gg*r.   

If I buy a set of gaskets, jets and sundries, and take the carbs apart, what else can I clean? (At least with injectors you can SEE them squirt! Or not)   Or do I bite the bullet and get SU (Burlen) to renovate them, at ten times the cost?    

John

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17 hours ago, JohnD said:

What about the"fuel stabi!isers?   

I would if storing for any time. Regular gasoline will keep good for a year, but ethanol stuff goes bad in a few months.

now, I think a lot if the issue is actually the carburettors engines, not fuel injected ones. Our old clunkers have direct to air vents that allow fresh air an unrestricted access to the tank when standing,  note that vacuum yiu get in a moderns tank. advice seems to vary between filling the tank right up when standing, or running it dry.

I’m wondering If a carbon canister as the Americans have had for eons on tank vents helps stop fresh damp air being drawn in when standing?

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2 hours ago, JohnD said:

SU HS6s.   

Hi John, OK maybe venturing in to eggs and grandmother territory here, but having in the past got some horrible caked carbs working, may be a couple of things to try.  I'm assuming at this point you haven't started any major tear down work on them, other wise we are fighting multiple problems, also from you previous posts I think you have already sorted fuel pump/filter issues and we are confident that we actually have a supply to the carbs.

Oh and further assumption they were sort of working OK before the Green monster appeared.

I normally make a mix of 50/50 petrol/diesel, as its cheap, but you can buy expensive carb cleaners if you like, one can can actually be useful.  I use petrol/diesel as petrol on its own evaporates too quick, and diesel on its own doesn't soften the petrol deposits.

If you have the Float Chamber covers off, and the Air domes off and air pistons with needles attached off (being careful to keep in sets for the correct carb bodies, dump the whole lot is the above mix and leave overnight. Then with a compressed air line blast everything clean making sure to try and get down the jet and thus through the jet to float chamber connecting tube (ideally from both ends if you have a small air gun, If not try extending the nozzle with a bit of rubber or plastic tube to get into the awkward spots.

Now check that the jets rise and fall smoothly in the body, have a good look at the float bowl jets (if they are the Grosse Ball ones they can easily get a flat on them and stick) i.e do a real double check that the float valves are working, a fluid feed from a can held above onto the inlet and lifting and lowering the float should give you a fairly good idea.  Clean the air piston slides.  Re-Assemble, and with springs out check that both pistons drop/rise at about the same rate as you rotate the carbs through 180 degs, then fit the springs and retest that they both lift with about the same resistance and drop at about the same rate and to about the same point.

Then give the spindles a shot of thin oil from outside and inside the carb body, and also the jets mech that sticks out the bottom. Fit and give it a whirl, provided the jets and float heights haven't been played with and they were working before, if you have fuel at an adequate pressure, then the engine should run. May not purr but petrol about the right time with compression? and a spark at about the right time and engine will normally run, and with CD type carbs with normally quite a wide tolerance from correct.

Alan

 

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John

Just in case your green slime has made it that far, have you cleaned out the float chamber inlet valve as well as the float chamber itself?

Paul

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Methyl Ethyl Ketone!?   Sounds dangerous!  Until I read that this polystyrene g!ue!   Instant memories of model assembly!   And You can buy it on Amazon!!   Must be safe as mothers milk, then!   Better than petrol/diesel mixture, or even the acetone/ATF mix that is said to loosen any seized fastener (really?).     

And thanks Alan for that detailed p!an!   I narrowed carbs stored for years before I just slapped them on.  They deserve a good clean!

John

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MEK is an extremely good cleaning agent. Particularly good at breaking down organics, like gum and residue you find in carbs. 

Generally, anything that’s safe to use is pretty rubbish at cleaning stuff. 

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I find the carb cleaner that Toolstation sells to be very effective. Also cheap.

If getting fuel to the float chamber but no further, it's not unknown for the link tube to the jet to block. Given that it has a brass ferrule at the float chamber end and the brass jet at the other, the potential for nasty chemistry seems high in this context......

Nick

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I've had the jets off, squirted in brake cleaner and blown through with the pressure line. Thought I'd gone right though the fuel pathway, so disappointed  it won't flow.    Maybe carb clenaer.

J.

PS  I have a small ultrasonic cleaner.  It's sized to take  pair of glasses, or dentures(!) but would take carb parts.  Anyone used such a cleaner on carb parts?

Edited by JohnD

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Add cleaner to the water?    What cleaner would you suggest?

I have some aerosol carb cleaner,  would that mix with the water?   I was thinking of using a mixture of petrol (the bath is a stainless steel container) and injector cleaner?

John

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Any mild detergent John! As in floor cleaner style as opposed to dishwashing liquid that is.......

Least that's what I have used in the past, and is also what we tend to use on the ship (and the ships ultrasonic has a couple of hundred litre capacity and bit more power!).

Phil

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Ah for the good old days of a heated 100 gallon Trichloroethane ultrasonic tank.... even the dirtiest engine block came out sparkling.

green spoilsports banned that.

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WhooHOO!

After stripping the carbs, cleaning and blowing them out, reassembly and refitting (ably assisted by my apprentice - see below) it runs!

The Project can continue!  I think I may have to revise the position of the radiator and put it to one side, with an electric fan and hose extensions, to facilitate access to the crank pulley, which is after all the objective of the Project!

Thanks for all advice and encouragement!

JOhn

IMG_20180916_104431.jpg

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Start 'em young....... and if they still have both eyes and most of their fingers by the time they are 15 or so, they've got engineering potential! :biggrin:

Nick

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