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6 hours ago, PaulAA said:

... a litre. Sheet, this stuff ain't cheap.

 

The reason they do it in a litre bottle is so that after you have filled the system with it, you have some left over, so that when you need to top it up some Muppet doesn't do so with ordinary fluid as they didn't have any silcone stuff left! :biggrin:

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Hi Paul, 

Sorry to hear of your problems, but at least it looks like you are getting there. 

I did my first ever brake bleed about a year ago and it was quite a learning experience. I couldn't work out why after I got quite a bit of fluid out of the rear brakes I then only got air, and yet I was topping up the M/C. What I hadn't realised was that the M/C was divided, with the small compartment at the front of it feeding the rear brakes. Access to that compartment was through a narrow slit. Once I'd worked that out, it was easy.

It sounds the same as yours. 

Cheers, Darren  

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12 hours ago, oldtuckunder said:

The reason they do it in a litre bottle is so that after you have filled the system with it, you have some left over, so that when you need to top it up some Muppet doesn't do so with ordinary fluid as they didn't have any silcone stuff left! :biggrin:

Alan, you card...  thing is, I had the remains of a bottle of DOT5 from repairing the damage done after the last Cock-Up (different mechanic, lest rotund, same beaming smile: "I've gone one better than DOT 5 and topped it it with DOT5.1"), but could I find it?  I dismantled the whole cellar shelving, car boot, "my" corner of the utility room, etc... nothing, nado.  I'm going to buy one of those 'break glass in emergency' cabinets and mount it somewhere prominent.

Thanks, Darren - that's helpful.  Oddly, I'd assumed that it would be a diagonal split in the braking system, rather than fore-aft.  Time to break out the Haynes.  Which reminds me of a recurring observation when watching those car porn vids on YT - the ones where Elmer from Arseville dismantles the front end of a Mercedes SLS seemingly without the aid of instructions... does he instinctively know the car this well, or is there a greasy Haynes just out of camera shot..?

Paul

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Strictly, once you've broken the seal on a bottle of brake fluid, it starts to absorb water, so one that been on your shelf since the las time should go down the drain.

John

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14 minutes ago, JohnD said:

Strictly, once you've broken the seal on a bottle of brake fluid, it starts to absorb water, so one that been on your shelf since the las time should go down the drain.

John

But not a problem with DOT 5 silicone, which is completely non-hygroscopic and has an almost indefinite service life.

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Older cars have front/rear split.  However, as the rear brakes tend to be rather less effective, more modern stuff has diagonal split giving one front and one rear - probably driven by legislation in the USA or Australia.  Of course, in the "normal" run of things this produces a fierce pull towards the side that is working at the front - dangerously so unless much more caster is dialled into the front suspension to reduce the effect.  This has the unfortunate side-effect of making the steering incredibly heavy, and suddenly PAS is needed...... which is why even little cars need PAS these days. 

Nick

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2 hours ago, PaulAA said:

But not a problem with DOT 5 silicone, which is completely non-hygroscopic and has an almost indefinite service life.

Ah!  I had forgotten which you were using!

j.

 

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Hi Paul

It is a tandem master cylinder with the larger area of the reservoir for the front brakes and the smaller area for the rear brakes, when filling up the larger area it overflows into the smaller area.

Hope this helps.

Cheers Kev.

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5 hours ago, Kev_tr6 said:

Hi Paul

It is a tandem master cylinder with the larger area of the reservoir for the front brakes and the smaller area for the rear brakes, when filling up the larger area it overflows into the smaller area.

Hope this helps.

Cheers Kev.

It does indeed - thanks, Kev.

Does anybody have an opinion about Bel-Ray DOT 5?  It seems to be the only stuff I can get hold of here - twenty-five quid for 2x 360ml.

Paul

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MGB Hive are doing 1Ltr of Automec Silcone (which I use) on eBay for £28.95  in free UK postage, on their web-site its 23.29 + shipping, and they do ship to europe, might just be worth messaging them for EU shipment cost, As in the UK it has to go courier not post (because its a fluid) it may not be much more expensive. 

Here's their ebay add

https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/Automec-Dot-5-Silicone-Brake-Clutch-Fluid-1-Litre-1000ml-High-Performance/1810970327?iid=381628704505&chn=ps&adgroupid=52130532935&rlsatarget=pla-411617461420&abcId=1133946&adtype=pla&merchantid=7287744&poi=&googleloc=9045563&device=c&campaignid=1057748120&crdt=0

 

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