Jump to content

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, oldtuckunder said:

John! Will you please stop posting engineering porn on this forum! I just took a brief look at that Catalogue and I'm already trying to work out how much heavy equipment I could get in the barn. I don't need it, but just feel a compulsion to have some of it.

I mean who could resist having a 

https://www.bidspotter.co.uk/en-gb/auction-catalogues/gordonbrothers/catalogue-id-gordon10039/lot-8105a662-8720-460f-a797-a90600cf8c88

If only I knew what a (Risk Assessment and Method Statement required prior to removal) meant

Alan

Hello Alan

                   A nearly 6.5 m traverse! You could mill a whole car on that!

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I visited an old friend in Cambridge on Sunday and he showed me his shed, where he has collected (and uses, most effectively) many varied and fabulous tools, most of them old but fully functional.  Resplendent upon his workbench was a Drummond lathe, very similar to this one, which made me weak at the knees.

Keep up the tool porn, John, for those of us of an 'inadequate disposition' (= shed-less)

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello All

               We went to a local classic car show today and I bought a couple of things one was a NOS cylinder head gasket set(payne)

The other was a complete brain storm moment and to wind John D up!

I have not remotest use for it but what the hell !! and now I may have the biggest one on this forum!

So has anyone got anything between 12" and 16" diameter that need measuring?

The piston is an old one of John,s for reference of size!

Roger

ps its even bigger than Spitty flywheel!

when you have all finished laughing I may take to Severn Valley Railway and donate it if they want it!

DSC07908.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That cost someone serious money when it was new....... limited application for most folks now.... :tongue:

and if we are going for a "I'm the biggest nutter on the forum" competition.......... I'm not going to try and top that!  Others may....... though I suspect you were the clear winner before this anyway :biggrin:

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Nick Jones said:

That cost someone serious money when it was new....... limited application for most folks now.... :tongue:

and if we are going for a "I'm the biggest nutter on the forum" competition.......... I'm not going to try and top that!  Others may....... though I suspect you were the clear winner before this anyway :biggrin:

Nick

Hello Nick

                   Thank,s for the compliment  and I resemble that remark !

Roger

ps it was £15 !!!!! and all bits are there!

Now what next? what else do I not need ?

look at this page £210

http://www.radisol.co.uk/interactivepages/westerntooling/05-micrometers.htm

Edited by rogerguzzi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so green with envy, I resemble the Grouch!   Killer score, Alan!   Top of the league.    My current search is for a TiG welder that costs less than a cheap car to buy.   

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To which end, how does this, obviously a stick arc welder at only £155 merit the title " ARC TIG/MMA inverter welder "  https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/clarke-at165-arc-tigmma-inverter-welder/

When a true TiG welder, with that distinctive pink-tipped torch and a gas bottle,  costs nearly £700? https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/draper-expert-acdc160p-160a-tig-hf-welder-230v/

It gets more confusing when you look at used units!

What should I look for to be sure that a given unit really is a "Tig" welder?

John

Edited by JohnD
Double post

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah!   Doh!   Anyone used one of these?    At a third the price the of the cheapest 'real' TiG sold by MachineMart, is it a toy?  Could I do useful work with it?

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Biggest price break in TIGs is DC only which will do steel and stainless steel only vs. AC/DC which can also do aluminium. The latter being considerably more expensive.

Well worth considering a used machine, but stick to the higher end known brands so there is some chance of repair if they go wrong.

We found 160A ac/dc unit by Migatronic a few years ago. Cost £600 but the new equivalent would have been £2.5k!

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2018 at 10:53 AM, JohnD said:

Ah!   Doh!   Anyone used one of these?    At a third the price the of the cheapest 'real' TiG sold by MachineMart, is it a toy?  Could I do useful work with it?

John

Someone mentioned Rtech on here somewhere. I had a AC/DC one and it was a real struggle. Think it may have had issues with the foot pedal. A foot pedal with tig is a must btw. Swapped it up for a thermal Arc. Omg what a difference. My rubbish welding advanced to mildly bad over night. Well worth the £1100 ish price tag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, yorkshire_spam said:

To say I'm envious would be an extreme understatement!

I've wanted one for ages. Already knocked up a trumpet flaring tool for some aluminium ones.

20180821_200638.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Chippy63 said:

Just got this. Absolutely lovin it.

20180717_184716.jpg

Hello Chippy

                      I have one of those but not as clean and on a home made wooden stand and without the luxury of a clutch and a bit tired like me! not to keen on the manual oilers I seem to get sprayed with oil!

But it is great for doing the smaller jobs but I just have to remember to take light cuts not like on the big one!(takes Triumph Spitfire Flywheel with room to spare) but is a handfull on small jobs! but both have screw cutting as yours does.

They great for making swarf!

Roger

ps I do not have reverse on mine and not sure how that would work with a screwed on chuck?

 

Edited by rogerguzzi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, rogerguzzi said:

Hello Chippy

                      I have one of those but not as clean and on a home made wooden stand and without the luxury of a clutch and a bit tired like me! not to keen on the manual oilers I seem to get sprayed with oil!

But it is great for doing the smaller jobs but I just have to remember to take light cuts not like on the big one!(takes Triumph Spitfire Flywheel with room to spare) but is a handfull on small jobs! but both have screw cutting as yours does.

They great for making swarf!

Roger

ps I do not have reverse on mine and not sure how that would work with a screwed on chuck?

 

Hi Roger, apparently mine has a Norton gearbox which is  good thing and yes the clutch is great. I don't think I'll be trying the reverse any time soon.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Chippy63 said:

Hi Roger, apparently mine has a Norton gearbox which is  good thing and yes the clutch is great. I don't think I'll be trying the reverse any time soon.

Steve

Hello Steve

                   Yes it has and is a desireable feature does it have a power cross slide? That,s what is missing on mine and I am used to on the big one which is a pain when facing and you want a good finish

Roger

ps still a good lathe though in the small range

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your lathe, Chippy, is tool porn, then mine is dirty, decrepit porn.  Still, it does it for me. 

At least, it does what I know how to do with it.    

John

 

P1040043.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JohnD said:

If your lathe, Chippy, is tool porn, then mine is dirty, decrepit porn.  Still, it does it for me. 

At least, it does what I know how to do with it.    

John

 

P1040043.JPG

I'm sure it's great John. As long as the oily bits have be well oiled thats the main thing I guess rather than how clean it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's another one for the tool nerds, rather beyond any non-pro's pockedt, I fear.    "Broken Tap Removal by Metal Disintegration Machine"     

Anyone will realise that a broken tap in a drilling is a disaster.    Harder than most drills, and in this case deep into the casting, it's almost un-removable.   I've seen some videos from knarly American machinists, but this guy takes the biscuit, and his technique is a winner.     I've no idea how it works, but anyway!

 

 

 

Edited by JohnD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spark erosion. Standard technique in ferrous materials. For removing a broken tap in non-ferrous metals  an Alum solution is the easy method.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCADI0YSt8M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×