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The tools of the the engineer fascinate me.  Micrometers, so simple, so accurate, and in a whole range of sizes.   So here's the opportunity:

https://www.bidspotter.co.uk/en-gb/auction-catalogues/asset-disposal-services/catalogue-id-asset-4-10006/lot-62339c33-b97d-458a-8c59-a84000c1857b

https://www.bidspotter.co.uk/en-gb/auction-catalogues/asset-disposal-services/catalogue-id-asset-4-10006/lot-66285ac9-7089-4993-b35d-a84000cd3b2e

In two lots, a full set of micrometers, from one to TWELVE INCHES in fractions of a thousanth!   Oh Joy!

That apart from those up to 3", I cannot think of why or how I should need them, to have that full set would be like owning a complete set of cigarette cards, or a Royal Flush at poker!

Anyone else have asimilar obsession?

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Hello John

                    Yes

 I have at least 3 off  0" to 1"  2 off  0 to 25 mm 

1 off  1" to 2" Moore and wright Micrometer 

 1 off Shardlow  0 to 6"(1" steps with changeable ends and setting gauges)

2 off dial gauges 

1 off verdict gauge   

1 off cheap digital caliper 

1 off good Japanese digital caliper (Mitutoyo)

1 off 0" to 9" Mauser (0 mm  to 250 mm) Caliper

Plus all the mechanical calipers and rulers

2 sets of digital scales  0 to 500 gm,  0 to 5 kg

Roger

 

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Edited by rogerguzzi

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I've got a a fair few that came with my mill and lathe including a set of micrometers from 1 - 6".

I'm not a precision engineer by nature so I mostly use my cheap electronic "very near" which is what real engineers call verniers.

Nick

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Being a bit of a tool nerd myself, my I pass on a bit of nerdiness about vernier calipers. We shouldn't generically call them "verniers" especially the digital variety.
The word vernier refers to the vernier scale marked on the caliper not the actual tool itself. Vernier calipers are calipers with a vernier scale. "Plain" calipers were often used just to transfer/copy a size from 1 item to another without actually giving a "measurement" reading.  Before digital readouts the most accurate way of visually measuring was to read the vernier scale. You would read the main scale to ascertain the "major measurement" such as each millimeter and the vernier scale would give you the fraction of the millimeter, eg .6mm. The most accurately aligned indicator on the vernier scale was the fraction. In the image below, the caliper is measuring .36   The zero on the vernier scale is past the .3 indicator line so it is .3 and a bit. The number 6 on the verier scale is the most accurately aligned mark to the main scale therefore the extra bit is .6  So the true measurement is .3 plus .06 = .36

Being a woodworker, I have never really worried about about vernier calipers or digital calipers, for as my trade teachers would say, "nothing that half a pound of putty wont fix!".  I often apply this advice to my auto body repairs!!!!!!

 

image.png.81a7193c59691f9445470c76957bcc3e.png 

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At the opposite end of the scale, this is dangerously close to being a toy rather than a tool.  So at the risk of some rather sharp intakes of breath, I got one of these for Christmas: 

https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/CL54321/cleo-messograf-mechanical-pencil-07

 

A slightly heavy, odd shaped, but actually quite nice pencil with a vernier on the side.  Also has capability to act as tyre tread gauge and info on machine thread sizes on the side.  No idea on what the accuracy is, but for measuring the occasional item under about 90mm it's not bad.

I dare say that for the price you could buy both a number pencils and a more accurate vernier!

 

 

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Cool, egret!

I'd put that with my retractable biro that has a soft rubber tip around where the biro comes out, so I can use it on the tablet, instead of my fat fingers!

And I'm most envious of Roger's lovely cased, micrometric measure-all!

I have a bore guage set, like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/6pc-Telescopic-Gauge-Set-8-150mm-cylinder-bore-telescoping-id-internal-inside/263071189826?epid=554332930&hash=item3d4043cb42:g:xKUAAOSwN8FZqoEH I tried to use it recently to help a friend who was undecided about reboring an engine that had a palpable ridge at the top of the bore.    It prove much more difficult than I thought to demonstrate how much wear was present.   

My procedure was to set the gauge in the bore, wiggle it to place it in the widest part and lock it.  Then tip, to remove it and measure.    I had to use a vernier caliper as  didn't have a suitbaly sized micrometer (OH! for that rack of micrometers!)     But it proved difficult to get consistent numbers.     If I were to do it again, is there a better method?

JOhn

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On 1/19/2018 at 1:48 PM, JohnD said:

Cool, egret!

I'd put that with my retractable biro that has a soft rubber tip around where the biro comes out, so I can use it on the tablet, instead of my fat fingers!

And I'm most envious of Roger's lovely cased, micrometric measure-all!

I have a bore guage set, like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/6pc-Telescopic-Gauge-Set-8-150mm-cylinder-bore-telescoping-id-internal-inside/263071189826?epid=554332930&hash=item3d4043cb42:g:xKUAAOSwN8FZqoEH I tried to use it recently to help a friend who was undecided about reboring an engine that had a palpable ridge at the top of the bore.    It prove much more difficult than I thought to demonstrate how much wear was present.   

My procedure was to set the gauge in the bore, wiggle it to place it in the widest part and lock it.  Then tip, to remove it and measure.    I had to use a vernier caliper as  didn't have a suitbaly sized micrometer (OH! for that rack of micrometers!)     But it proved difficult to get consistent numbers.     If I were to do it again, is there a better method?

JOhn

Hello John

                   This is what we really want if only to play with?(people spend more on Sky and phones in 1 month! to watch Cr**P and talk B****ks!)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004NOL95O/ref=dra_a_ms_mr_hn_xx_P1400_1000?tag=dradisplay0bb-21&ascsubtag=5e1c1366311985644ad8a69131117282_S

Sod the Picasso,s give me tools any day

Roger

ps the sad tool collector! I am sure I need them all at least once!

I will sort a few photo,s of some old type tools to show you in the next few days

perhaps a quiz? as to what they are?

That would make an interesting thread! I have done this at my local pub/club and the young! have no idea if it does not have buttons or a touch screen?

Edited by rogerguzzi

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I wasn't entirely truthful in my OP, as I do have a few micrometers, and just today, thanks to eBay, I have made up the set, from 1 to six inches in one inch steps.

Oh, joy!   The nerdy pleasure of the complete set is not diminished by the certainty that I shall never use any of them bigger than the three inch in anger, and in complete honesty even those rarely.    But to know that it is possible for me to measure something to one thousanth of an inch, be it anything from up to six inches wide, is immense!   

 

A set of micrometers.JPG

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8 hours ago, JohnD said:

I wasn't entirely truthful in my OP, as I do have a few micrometers, and just today, thanks to eBay, I have made up the set, from 1 to six inches in one inch steps.

Oh, joy!   The nerdy pleasure of the complete set is not diminished by the certainty that I shall never use any of them bigger than the three inch in anger, and in complete honesty even those rarely.    But to know that it is possible for me to measure something to one thousanth of an inch, be it anything from up to six inches wide, is immense!   

 

A set of micrometers.JPG

Hello John

                  Do you want to borrow a set of gauges to test the accuracy ?

That,s assuming you have the feel(the rat sh*T helps but it is feel!)

Perhaps we are thinking we are precision engineers ? or just getting a good fit(there is a difference!)

Roger

ps is there one missing?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rogerguzzi

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On 04/02/2018 at 8:27 PM, JohnD said:

Don't know about precision, or being engineers, but my new dizzie drive plug pleases me: http://sideways-technologies.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/7637-trigger-wheel-mounting-vitesse/&page=2&tab=comments#comment-101908

I looked at eBay for setting standards to do just that, but they are a tenner each.

John

 

 

 

Hello John

                   Would you like me the send the test gauges with the piston introducer(Sounds rude?) but sounds technical

I think they are 1",2" ,3",4",5"

Roger

ps then you convince yourself you are working to 0.0005"

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39 minutes ago, JohnD said:

Wonderful!

I promise to return them!

John

Hello John

                   Will do and isn't this what this forum and old car clubs about? if not it is all pointless?

Roger

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I baught a full set of exspanding reamers for 25 pound lovely bit of kit,

won't use them but had to have them 

pink

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On 4/16/2018 at 7:20 PM, pinky said:

I baught a full set of exspanding reamers for 25 pound lovely bit of kit,

won't use them but had to have them 

pink

Hello Pinky

                    Can I ask were you bought them from?

Roger

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That reminds me, Roger!   I have used your standards and labelled all my micrometers with a correction factor.   Now I can measure to one thou from one to six inches, and reliably!

I'll. Return your little devices, with thanks!

John

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9 hours ago, rogerguzzi said:

Hello Pinky

                    Can I ask were you bought them from?

Roger

hi roger, .

 

baught them at a car jumble,  guy selling lots of tools, not many people new what they were, even the guy selling them didn't no 

I had used them before on wessex helicopter troop seats,

pink 

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one of my verniers was made by my old man as part of his training course in Switzerland (many, many many, years ago).

Dunno why, he was an ELECTRICAL engineer.

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