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That's slightly disturbing about the steering joints. Good you found it!!!

But the car does look very decent. 20 years is good for cellulose although wax does help. Boring job though

 

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Nice one, good to see it back on the road. Looking good.

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I have an extensive collection (4 or 5) of the old style rebuildable joints.  We did try a set of poly-bushes in one, but the result was disappointing.  What I would consider slightly excess movement from the outset, which got worse quite quickly.  I've had better results in the past using ordinary O-rings.

IIRC the T2000 joints, while much nicer, don't work on the small chassis cars as there isn't room inside the turret for them.

Going back a little in time..... some pics of the rear brake pipe run.  Turned the 3 way connector upside down as I just couldn't get a tight enough bend to miss the floor without kinking the pipe.

P1190915s.jpgP1190919s.jpg

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While better than the previous run in that it doesn't rub on the top of the diff any more.... turns out it's still the wrong routing for a roto car.  Griffipaul was kind enough to post this pic on the TSSC forum showing how it should be

P1030022.thumb.JPG.1af728c0aa2bed510fd297e0bb66d4dc.jpg

I also changed out the pipe from the M/C as I knew it was getting a bit rusty behind the heater.  This meant removing the heater, and also revealed that under the wrinkled paint around the M/Cs, things were very rusty

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Paint and rust scraped off....

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dosed with hydrate 80.....

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Painted.  You'll note the different shade of grey.  This is because I've noted that my garage floor paint is not afraid of brake fluid...... and I had some left.  We shall see.

P1190930s.jpg

All back together.  The brake M/C was found to be weeping (though a "proper" Girling one and not old) so was treated to a seal kit.  

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52 minutes ago, Escadrille Ecosse said:

That's slightly disturbing about the steering joints. Good you found it!!!

Yes.....! In fact it was the upper joint, where the UJ joins the column shaft that was slightly slack.  There is quite a large flat on the shaft there and the bolt sits hard across that, so it's unlikely it would ever actually manage to turn inside it.  However, at the rack end there is no flat but instead, a groove all the way around so the splines must be very well engaged and firmly clamped.  This end doesn't seem to have be moving (the groove is a bit deeper than the flat allowing better clamping) but I did relieve the holes anyway to make sure.  New bolts and nylocs too.  Nice to be able to steer!

While in the same area I noted that the lower column was very tight inside the upper column.  As these are meant to be able to telescope in the event of an accident, this seemed like a bad thing, though I have my doubts about the clamp arrangement allowing it anyway.  Both parts were removed.  The lower column proved to have issues with straightness as well as being very dirty and rusty.  I did spend a bit of time on it before grabbing a less ugly one from stock and tidying that instead.  Now moves as it should.

Going outside to swear some more at the Innovate box now..... :blink:  I should probably buy something new but that means more expense and also that I have to choose something from a fairly bewildering array....

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I like the piping runs. Look made at the makers even if not exactly as original.

As for the bulkhead, always another job but Interesting to hear how the floor paint does!

I am also always interested to hear about efi related stories as I am converting the Spitfire from Webers to injection as part of the rebuild.

 

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8 hours ago, Nick Jones said:

 

Got some nice ali drip trays under the GT cylinders.

I might have a brand new innovate, was going to fit one to the now abandoned supercharging project.

 

8 hours ago, Nick Jones said:

 

Going outside to swear some more at the Innovate box now..... :blink:  I should probably buy something new but that means more expense and also that I have to choose something from a fairly bewildering array....

 

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4 hours ago, yorkshire_spam said:

It must be the season for it Nick, I've just repainted under the master cylinders on the Spitfire.

:-)

 

Oddly I have just pulled the master cylinders on my car. A sod of a job as they are VERY close (you have to remove the brake MC cap to be able to remove the clutch one!) and my clutch master has been leaking. Just cleaned up the area and washed off with brake cleaner. Will dig out some paint in the morning.....

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1 hour ago, RedRooster said:

Got some nice ali drip trays under the GT cylinders.

I might have a brand new innovate, was going to fit one to the now abandoned supercharging project.

Dunno how you had me quoted as saying that..... :blink: or am I really loosing the plot? :pinch:  (Kids say yeah.....)

Thought about making some drip trays.  Too lazy.....  It's that pitted there now it wouldn't be unreasonable to renew the whole panel - with a stainless steel wipe-clean one!

As far as swearing at the Innovate; after some poking at it, checking the wiring (all ok as far as I can see) and successfully getting it to talk to my laptop via it's serial port - no change.  It would happily and repeatably calibrate to the old (genuine Bosch) LSU 4.2 sensor. That was reading 20.9 in free air(correct) and responding to being huffed on.  However, as before, it persistently threw the error 8 code immediately after apparently calibrating to the new one.  Some reading on the internet suggested upgrading the firmware.  I'd already established I had the oldest version (1.00a) loaded, so this seemed like a fair shout.  However, the firmware update utility on the Innovate website didn't work.  Getting frustrated now. :wallbash:

Back to the internet.  Found a couple of oldish but very useful threads talking about hardware and software issues with the LC-1.  Some of the contributors appeared to know their stuff.  Seems that I may have been fortunate that the utility didn't work as apparently the firmware it loads (1.10) is the least stable one!  It was suggested to return to version 1.00a or reload it as plan a or, try a beta version (1.20) that Innovate put up briefly and then dropped as that apparently works better.  Reloaded verion 1.00a which made no difference.  So I bit the bullet, pulled the exhaust and collector off (no fun at all, plenty of cussing at that :swear:) and swapped the sensors back.  Close examination side by side (which I should have done before but didn't) suggests that the ebay seller claiming genuine Bosch for the replacement may be a lying bastard......

Anyway, all back together and working properly with the calibration of the dash gauge now corrected to match the  direct reading via serial.  Working happily for now.  Will probably keel over again before too long, but took more than 2000 miles to do it last time.  Car running well and the diff still seems quiet...... remarkable! :smile:

Have to put a skim of glaze over the patch on the LH wing, but otherwise I'm just going to drive it.  Time to finish the GT6.

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It's taken me to work a couple of times this week.  I even washed it last night.  First time since last year's European trip, so what with that and 4 months in the garage where welding and grinding has been happening, it was disgracefully filthy.  Though the grey hides it well.  Can't say it is rewarding to wash.  The paint is done, where there is any paint left.....

And today it took us to Exmoor.  Dunkery Beacon and Tarr Steps.  Sunny and hot.  Very hot later.  Too hot even.  The roads were melting - literally.  Me too. On the way home, with ambient around 30ºC, the fuel pump was protesting.  Car ran fine, water temps were fine, oil temps...... not so fine, especially since I wasn't ragging it at all.  Pump was cavitating I think and it's fuel temps.  Put my hand on the tank when we got home at it was hot: 40 - 45ºC I'd guess.  Not typical conditions for the UK but I've noticed similar in more southerly parts.  Pump doesn't usually shout so much though.....

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The dissertation has now been marked and passed muster.  Attached for your amusement/bemusement In theory it's possible to run more simulations, though I'm not sure how long his software licence is good for.......

Having driven the car more, and on more challenging roads, I can confirm that it is definitely "different".   Most noticeable is the way that the suspension appears to have been quite substantially stiffened, especially at the back - although it hasn't actually been changed.

10583574 Final Report.pdf

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Most impressed!

40 something years ago when I was doing my Mechanical Engineering degree we were taught FEA from first principles by resolving matrix equations - longhand.

The calculations for these would expand exponentially so by the time the mesh got to about 9 x 9 nodes it would take the best part of an entire pad of A4 paper for the workings!

Anything more required access to the mainframe computer.

How things have changed.

Interesting to see the comments on the rigid gearbox tunnel cover and potential contribution from the engine/gearbox. I thought about both of these when I was building the race Spitfire but decided that a rigidly mounted engine/gearbox was a step too far in terms of both noise and oil tightness!

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2 hours ago, Nick Jones said:

The dissertation has now been marked and passed muster.  Attached for your amusement/bemusement In theory it's possible to run more simulations, though I'm not sure how long his software licence is good for.......

Having driven the car more, and on more challenging roads, I can confirm that it is definitely "different".   Most noticeable is the way that the suspension appears to have been quite substantially stiffened, especially at the back - although it hasn't actually been changed.

Brilliant stuff Nick. Brings back memories, about 15 years ago I shared office space with Mech Eng guys when I was lecturing in computing. My research at the time was using Graphics cards to accelerate the calculations for things like FEA and CFD. 

Anyway, it brought to mind the following:

When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meager and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarely, in your thoughts advanced to the stage of science.”
William Thomson 3 May 1883

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Thanks for sharing Nick (and mostly Chris), interesting read! A little shocked to learn now much the body stiffens the chassis by, even on a convertible. By the way, I really quite like the bolt-in rear cross member idea.

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12 hours ago, Escadrille Ecosse said:

Anything more required access to the mainframe computer.

Most of this was done on a cheap Acer laptop, though it did make it sweat a bit. Hardware appears to have won the battle for now.

I understand this very thorough piece of work has scored 85%. We await the full PM to explain what happened to the missing 15....... :tongue:

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6 minutes ago, JumpingFrog said:

Thanks for sharing Nick (and mostly Chris), interesting read! A little shocked to learn now much the body stiffens the chassis by, even on a convertible. By the way, I really quite like the bolt-in rear cross member idea.

The one that rocked me was the difference between hood up and down. Especially since subjectively, it seems floppier with the hood up, as the sense of relative movement between parts is stronger.

The bolt-in rear cross-member was a real bugger to execute. Especially with the body sort of on.  Computer said it would be much more effective than a t-shirt arrangement. This is because although the double t-shirt design used on the TRs is effective, you can’t apply it properly on a small chassis car and still have things like an exhaust or propshaft.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks to Chris for sharing this. I scraped through GCSE maths, and the amount of work, effort and detail that's gone into this boggles my mind.

Took the Vitesse out the other day, couldn't work out why the glass was rattling in the doors, then dawned on me I had the soft top down.

Edited by Mark

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Congratulations to Christopher!   I had thought that John  Thomason had had the last word on stiffening the small chassis Triumph ages ago, but Chris had found several other effective mods. And more importantly, proved it!    IMHO an excellent dissertation, that an Hons degree will barely do justice to.

John

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What a great work.

One of the surprising results for me was the impact of the hood for stiffness. 

Martin

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2 hours ago, Martin said:

What a great work.

One of the surprising results for me was the impact of the hood for stiffness. 

Martin

Me too!  The hood on this car is vey tight, which probably has an influence. I suspect that the hood and the doors were interacting. We could have done a “hood up, doors open” measuring sequence I suppose, but he had too much data already!

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MoT preparation on all three Triumphs today.  One "discovery", or rather a closer look at something I've been vaguely aware of for a little while was some unwanted play in the steering wheel.

It's an unusual wheel that I was given may years ago and it's been on the Vitesse since I first put it one the road in '89.  It's unusual in that the rim is entirely wood (laminate I think) and the 3 spokes plug into accurately made letter-box slots in it and are clamped by long self tapping screws that pass right through the wood and metal sandwich and pull everything up snug.  Sounds dodgy..... actually not provided all the screws are done up.  Though it's always been fairly flexible because of the slim rim.

It's been a bit more flexible lately.  This usually means the screws have worked loose and need nipping up.  However, investigation showed that the head had come off one of them leaving the shank more or less flush with the wood.  It has resisted attempts to unscrew with needle-nose pliers, attempts to tap it round with a punch and attempts to reform a slot in it to unscrew it.  It is stuck in the aluminium spoke, not the wood.  I've tried heating that.  I've tried beating on it (but carefully!).  The other two came out easily (of course!).

I have fitted a lesser wheel as an emergency measure. but would very much like to save this one, or at the very least to re-use the boss which is both nice a slim and takes the standard horn-push.  It has absolutely no markings on it at all.  The PCD of the 6 screws is 67.5mm.

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This is what the screws should look like...

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And the one that isn't coming out.  I've also had a cautious go at drilling it out.  The fact that the screw shank is less than 3mm dia,  about as hard as the drills themselves and surrounded by soft wood........ Well - no chance.  Photo makes the wood damage loo worse than it is.  I'm out of ideas.

Attempting to catch a blob of weld on the top seems likely to kill the wood (even if dampened first), though briefly shorting a big battery between screw and spoke might create a bit of heat at the critical interface between screw and spoke......

Ideas welcome!

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What a truly lovely steering wheel. As you say most have an unnecessarily large boss.

It is obviously period and suspect it came from something expensive that used the Triumph steering gear as I have seen something like that before. An Italia, Gilbern, etc or maybe a Lotus Elite.

Lotus-Elite-dash-900x600.jpg.c9c45bd19eaca614d9a212b2f73e1f09.jpg

Judging by the grain the rim will have been laminated by steaming and glueing around a circular former. Wonderful.

Never get something like that nowadays, partly because un-reinforced wooden rimmed wheels are banned because they break up in an accident and you get impaled on that lovely slim boss whilst simultaneously having your wrists slit on the wood :blink:.

However same argument applies about crumple zones, airbags and NCAP ratings.

Short of cutting out a section of wood on the back removing the screw and then letting a new piece back in I'm not sure. I did this to repair one of our 160 year old sash windows. Different kind of loading though.

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What you could try is to cut away the wood round the outside of the screw just enough to get a grip on the screw itself. If you get a bit of thin wall brass/copper tube and make a very small core drill. When you have the screw out you can then open out the hole a bit more and glue in a wooden plug with a polyurethane type wood glue. When it's all dry drill a new hole for the screw and rebuild the wheel.

Bit of effort but worth it for such a nice wheel.

 

 

 

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Prepared to put a bit of effort in to save it.  I will tidy it up too.  It's shamefully dirty.....  Quite like the core drill idea, though it doesn't immediately solve the problem as I can only go as far as the spoke.  But maybe I can also drill out a bolt to fit over the screw with some decent glue once the core drill has done it's work.  The screw can't be that tight, it's just that there is nothing to get a hold of. As the current screw is only about 3mm OD, if I'm cunning about the core drill I may be able to keep the hole small enough to just go up a screw size....... wishful thinking maybe.....

I've been variously told that it's a Les Leston aftermarket and that it was a (high priced) dealer option.  Possibly it came from a 948 coupe.  Not quite convinced on the Les Leston as the boss design seems very different.  Never seen another like it though - not even in a picture.

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Thats tricky. I think I would try a Demel bit to flatten the surface off and then drill a 1/1.5/2 mm hole (on a drill press if you have one) and slowly open it up to remove the screw. 
If you are lucky yo should be able to get the thread remains out of the metal..... wont be easy :(

Mike

 

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