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zetecspit

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  1. zetecspit

    Poly bush colours

    Moos (Triumphtune) used to sell nylon bushes, before poly became available. So could well be theirs, depending on age. I think Jons bushes are a fairly recent addition to his range. May be a different hardness?
  2. zetecspit

    Poly bush colours

    http://www.wolfitt.com/ he makes/sells them
  3. zetecspit

    My Spitfire

    No probs. I will see him tomorrow (we are welding a vitesse floorpan to thin air...) Not sure when he last changed the oil. If he can't remember that should be good enough....
  4. zetecspit

    My Spitfire

    friend does a lot of miles in his 13/60. And that runs off straight 30 oil (out the tap where he works) and has done for the last 150K. Would that be of any use? not sure when he last did an oil change. And the car doesn't get driven hard, just every single day. For the last 20+ years. And runs on lpg.
  5. zetecspit

    Nick & Chris's Gt6 Mk 3

    That really has changed a lot! Looking rather good.
  6. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    On the topic of sources, there is always an issue. There are very few (if any?) organisations that are independent. All the so-called think-tanks are sponsored, industries or politically-leaning institutions cunningly market themselves and we all end up not knowing what the truth is. Nobody is actually independent. Even the ones that intend to be end up having staff and "experts" whose incomes depend on the organisation. And therefore are afraid to contradict the "party line" Grrrrr.
  7. zetecspit

    1938 Practical Mechanics magazine

    What is quite scary is the age, 1938. Approx 40 years after it was published I was probably doing some of the light experiments at skool. And that was about 40 years ago..... Makes me ponder how fast time passes. My dad was born in 1931, and we are out celebrating his 88th birthday today with a lunch (he is not so good in the evenings these days) but he has lived through so amazing times. Not always in a good way, but then again he loved his wartime years, sent away to live on a farm with relatives. And yes, youtube videos can be damn useful, once you find one by somebody who understands (a) what they are doing and (b) can actually get decent footage so you can see what you need to do. (used it yesterday to adjust the clutch on the puddlejumper, first 2 videos were hopelss, 3rd time lucky and it was then I realised the knob I could just get my fingers to, while the battery tray tried to sever my arm, was correct but seized. Persistence and blood got there in the end.)
  8. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    Phew. Thank you for clearing that up. I was getting worried. Now, where do chocolate biscuits grow?
  9. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    Ration books?
  10. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    I think it is time to stock up on chocolate biscuits..... What about tea? surely we can't run out of that? The country would grind to a halt. Maybe that is the EU's cunning plan. Saying that, seems people are more worried about their quinoa, avocados and coconut milk. Says a lot about us and how things have changed since I were a lad.
  11. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    That could be do-able. But it should not include the option to remain. As that has already been decided by the first "peoples vote" So on the ticket, 2 options. The "negotiated deal" and "no deal"? What I worry about is that everybody who wants another referendum on leaving at all (AKA "peoples vote") seem to assume this time it will come out as remain. What if it happens and again it comes out leave? What then? Had an interesting discussion last night with 2 friends when we were out running in the wind and rain. One is self employed, and struggling for work (his skills are being outsourced to china) And he voted leave with the notion that the "Great British Empire" would return and all would be easy. He says we should just leave and it will be fine. And cites how after the bvote, none of the terrible things predicted happened (which is largely true, another problem with the remain campaign, their warnings about impending disaster immediately after a vote to leave just never materialised, and now many thinking when we do leave nothing much will happen) The other chap works for St Gobain (a handy source of Norton abrasives, but he can't get as many "samples" these days) He voted remain, but interestingly he has accepeted the fact we are leaving, and reckons just leave, no deal and then businesses will rule the day and trade will be sorted very quickly. Nothing like big businesses having government foolery mess up their profits to get things moving. And I too subscribe to that model, and yes, we will get shafted short term, a bit like the ERM fiasco. The problem at the moment is that uncertainty/hope(that we will get a "good deal" or even remain) etc is just getting in the way. I think a 2 year transition period but that we will then have no agreed "overall deal" at the end is the way forward. That would allow things to progress individually. So rather than have the Irish issue affect (say) trade deals, business can just get on and get trade agreed. In fact that should automatically sort the Irish issue. As for us importing cheaply from eg China and then selling into the EU, a carry-forward tariff could be arranged. And lets be honest, trade is the big one. Things like Air traffic control etc is small fry. It works now, so why should it stop working. Why would either side want to suddenly put pointless barriers in the way of cooperation, unless they wanted to be difficult and use it as a bargaining chip. It works both ways. Right, now off to pack the car for Stoneleigh. Anybody want a cuppa, drop in to stall 291b in Hall 1. I will even have nibbles of the fattening variety until they have all been scoffed.
  12. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    Possibly, but I bet their rationale are all different. The political grief in the UK is not just within the UK. Look at France, just a couple of years ago Macron was hailed, not largely hated. Italy is going through a rough patch, and I know very little about other countries. But I expect dissatisfaction amongst the people is at a high level in many countries.
  13. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    Couldn't agree more about no other income etc. Usually the POTUS sticks all their wealth into a blind trust, which seems sensible. However, Trump didn't (at least initially, CBA to check progress on that) which is worrying. But a similar setup for UK politicians would be very welcome. After all, they could still take income from their investments if the salary was not adequate, and I guess something like a property portfolio is pretty inert so wouldn't require too much to keep an eye on it. But stocks/shares/company investments etc should all be away from any MP's eyes. As should positions on boards or as advisors. And as for being employed by companies that have benefited from their policies once they have left "public service", that should be punishable by having to compete is a new version of Big Brother or suchlike.
  14. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    Yep, many european countries have "outposts" dotted about. But the fact Gibraltar is nibbled out of Spain seems to really worry them. Thought they would like it.... after all what would they do with the place?
  15. zetecspit

    May's Brexit Plan

    I think you have got the right idea, but underestimate the number who don't fit your groupings. Now, I am not going to claim to spend all day digging into what all the MP's believe, but just yesterday I read something about Jezza, and his offer to TM. Seems commentators think the offer was designed to be impossible for her to accept. And then that the offer would cause him to cause further splits within Labour. This issue is a sh*tstorm of epic proportions. Every party is split (ok, not the greens and some of the other minnows) about what they want, in fact more than split, multiple fractures is more like it. The other problem is still the way remain campaigners are promoting their cause. Still far too negative, and ignoring the main reasons the majority of voters put their cross against leave. Those issues are free movement of people, perceived sovereignty, perceived freedom to trade freely with anybody we choose. And less obviously CAP and fishing rights have been mentioned when discussing with people I know have had a proper think about how to vote. So what we actually DO want starts with restricting free movement, frictionless trade with the EU (and that solves the Irish problem) but also ability to agree our own trade deals. Those 2 are mutually incompatible unless goods forwarded into Europe could be tracked/tariffed somehow. Then keep our fishing grounds and set our own agricultural policy. Oh, and stick 2 fingers up at Spain over Gibraltar. Security and all that gubbins should be simple, all agencies essentially want to do the same job and cooperate, unless they have their own agenda. That happens already. The biggest issue is the free trade with Europe. Both side REALLY want it, but the EU wants a price for it. One we are not prepared to pay at present. The other issue with the current politicians is they have mostly done those bloody PPE degrees, which teaches largely off the same agenda. Centralised politics, and I fully expect there is a hefty bit of teaching about how the EU is the solution to all our problems. And maybe that is why the British people are fed up with our political classes. Should MP's have to have had REAL jobs for a minimum of 10 years (or even 20) plus have had to have lived in the area they represent for a minimum time period before running in an election. A serious point. I am fed up with my local area having outsiders renting a flat just before campaigns start.
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