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docman

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About docman

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    Triumph, Jaguar, Lotus, vintage boats, antique clocks
  1. I am hoping to get some feedback from GT6 owners that are currently running triple Strombergs. How pleased are you with the conversion, was it worth the expense? Since I already have a mild cam and header, a triple Stromberg setup seems to be the most logical and cost effective next step to improve my engine's performance. Richard Good and Jeff Palty in the US each have decades of building Triumph 6's, and although their main focus is the larger TR6 engine, they claim that the triple 150CD setup has been very effective with the 2L engines. Also, 150CD's are shorter and fit under the GT6 bonnet without modification. I know a popular upgrade to series II E types is to revert back to the triple carb setup of the series I cars - that has to tell you something (I would think)?!? From Richard Good's site: The Triple Stromberg System has grown steadily in popularity since I introduced it in 1991. More and more TR6 owners are realizing how well it performs, offering the high performance they want without a sacrifice in fuel economy or street manners. I have had great success using this system on high performance TR6 engines that I have built and have received excellent reports from customers who have installed the kit on their engines as well. I have always worked with the 175CD's but some of my customers have had equal success using SU HS6's. Strombergs and SU's have a sliding air valve creating a variable venturi to maintain high air velocity across the jet regardless of the volume of airflow. At idle when the engine is using very little air the air valve is only open a crack so the air still rushes past the jet to properly mix the fuel. As the throttle is opened and the load on the engine is increased the air valve rises, riding on the airflow to maintain velocity. At full throttle under load the air valves are fully open exposing a wide-open passage for air. This performance simply cannot be matched by a fixed venturi carb. If a fixed venturi is sized large enough to provide adequate flow at high rpm it will not mix the fuel properly at low rpm resulting in poor fuel economy. With triple Strombergs the fuel mileage is generally in the mid 20's and the performance is fantastic with instant acceleration and smooth power throughout the rpm range. Installation is easy with no modifications required to the stock carburetors. This system is a worthwhile improvement to a stock engine and is of even greater benefit to a modified engine.
  2. Still looking for the GT6 yellow book. When Googled, all I get are phone books. Any leads will be appreciated. Otherwise, my alignment guru cited a bent frame on the left front corner (by a couple degrees) and rear bearings / bushings needing replacement before further adjustment is made. The previous pulling to the right under power and left when off throttle turned out to be severly worn bolts on the rear trailing arms. At least that is now corrected. Slow progress, but progress nonetheless.
  3. Yup - those be the ones. Trouble is, the site only had one for sale singularly. I bought it and there was no way to buy a second. That site (as it turns out) will also sell a pair, but I don't need three. I guess I'll have to wait until after the weekend to see how it's resolved.
  4. Steve - I'll bet your lowering is a tad more radical than my 1 inch drop. I only wanted to pass the 3-finger-in-the-wheel-well test. (Is it only Federal cars that look like they're set-up for off roading?) Found some Marina TRE's in Ohio. Hope my alignment wizard can work his magic with em. Your photobucket looks like #4 is running rose joints. What are you using to link to the pitman arms, did you machine your own tapers? What else is in the GT's yellow book and where can I get one?
  5. Mark, lowering the front raises the relative position of the wheels to the frame. This can result in a bump steer condition. To compensate, many Spit owners have raised the steering rack to maintain the relative alignment. GT6's don't have much clearance between the steering rack and the oil pan in which to raise the rack, so Morris TRE's is apparently a tried and proven option for lowered GT6's. Reducing the distance from the ball to the rack with low profile rod ends effectively has the same effect as pulling the rack up. These parts with a 4 wheel alignment should get me pretty close to ideal for street use (I hope).
  6. Mark, lowering the front raises the relative position of the wheels to the frame. This can result in a bump steer condition. To compensate, many Spit owners have raised the steering rack to maintain the relative alignment. GT6's don't have much clearance between the steering rack and the oil pan in which to raise the rack, so Morris TRE's is apparently a tried and proven option for lowered GT6's. Reducing the distance from the ball to the rack with low profile rod ends effectively has the same effect as pulling the rack up. These parts with a 4 wheel alignment should get me pretty close to ideal for street use (I hope).
  7. I have installed height adjustable shocks and 480# springs to lower my front end, and was advised to install shorter (Morris Marina Van) track rod ends, except the ebay link doesn't ship to the U.S. http://www.ebay.com/itm/120596350450?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649 Recommendations???
  8. My Mk3 GT6 pulls slightly to the right when given the beans and then to the left when I'm off the throttle. The pulling to the left may be exaggerated because I have already given more steering to compensate for the right pull under acceleration. It feels like it's something in the rear???
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