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  1. Today
  2. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    Hi John, If your plug part number has an "R" in it , the plug is a resistor type. eg BPR5ES-11. What brand of coil pack do you have? The one I was having trouble with was a different configuration to the diagram you have posted. My coil pack on the left looked for all intents and purposes to be the same as all the others except you will notice that the four pin plug is numbered in the opposite direction and the plug wires (P1 - P6) are a different sequence. With the plug wires correctly sequenced correctly, it fired first pop! Cheers, Doug
  3. Yesterday
  4. Has been posted extensively on other motoring sites but not, until now, here. Much of the content is actually quite reasonable and sensible. However, as so often the case, there is a distinct lack of understanding of the possible impacts on amateur car builder and modifiers, and regrettably a lack of understanding of even their own current rules and terminology. It also has the appearance of being done in haste and on the sly...... It will most affect the kit car and hot rod boys as the current proposal is to make it mandatory for the vehicle to be able to pass the MoT emissions standards prevailing at the time of the IVA, rather than those prevailing when the engine was built as is currently the case. This would also imply the same for radically altered vehicles requiring IVA although they don't actually appear to have heard of those and refer instead to something called "reconstructed (restored) classics" - which according to the DVLA wouldn't need an IVA anyway. Consultation, including online response link and email addresses is here https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/road-vehicles-improving-air-quality-and-safety I've just spent a fairly long time ploughing through it and my responses appear below. My general dislike for government and pointless meddling, by people who don't know what they doing, with things that don't need fixing, may show at times....... I did agree with them on some points too - as I said, it's not all daft. I'd urge you all (UK based) to respond to it, online at least, with letters to MP, Transport Minister and Shadow transport minister too if you can bear it Jesse Norman MP, Parliamentary under secretary of State for Roads, Local Transport and Devolution email: jesse.norman@dft.gsi.gov.uk use subject line Transport enquiry" Andy McDonald, Shadow Minister for Transport, email: info@andymcdonaldmp.org Closes Friday 2nd March! 7. Do you agree with the introduction of Euro 6 (heavy duty) emissions standards for buses in both national small series type approval (NSSTA) and individual vehicle approval (IVA) schemes? · Yes · No IVA route could include older vehicles being modified. System should take this into account and allow emissions testing under age related regulations. 8. Do you agree with the introduction of Euro 6 (heavy duty) emissions standards for trucks in both national small series type approval (NSSTA) and individual vehicle approval (IVA) schemes? · Yes · No Your reasons are? IVA route could include older vehicles being modified. System should take this into account and allow emissions testing under age related regulations. 9. Do you support the proposed introduction date of 3 months after these regulations are signed (an expected date of approximately 1 July 2018)? · Yes · No Your reasons are? Absolutely not! Why the unseemly haste? Why is this consultation open for just 4 weeks when government guidelines clearly state a 12 week recommended minimum (unless clear reasons are stated for the need for a short timescale) Do you not want people to comment? Are you afraid of the answers? Are you afraid that Brexit will mean you are no longer able to blame unpopular legislation on the EU? The proposed timescale means that changes could be implemented in law 7 months from first appearance of the consultation. For some of the people affected by this, that is well within the lifetime of a project and could have serious practical and financial consequences. 11. Do you agree with the introduction of WLTP in IVA for light vehicles built after 1 July 2018? · Yes · No Your reasons are? Vehicles come to the IVA test for a number of reasons including: - vehicles built in very low volumes from new parts for specialist purposes by specialist companies. - Kit cars, professional or amateur built from a mixture of new and recycled parts. - Radically altered vehicles (completely unmentioned in this consultation document!), professional or amateur built from a mixture of new and recycled parts. - Reconstructed classics - mentioned only because they are mentioned in the consultation document - they are NOT normally required to be submitted for IVA test under current rules - implying that those writing the consultation document do not understand the current rules! All of the above are VERY limited production - often "one offs" - and may be using recycled parts, including, in the interests of cost and simplicity, engines never designed to meet current emissions regulations. The imposition of WLTP implies that vehicles would have to be submitted for testing of fuel consumption and CO2 testing, which is clearly impractical and prohibitively expensive for very short production runs. It further implies that all vehicles tested would have to meet WLTP emissions standards prevailing at the time of registration including NOx which, where recycled engines have been used in the interests of cost and simplicity, they have not been designed to do. While there may be a case to made for applying prevailing MoT test standards to some of the categories mentioned above, to attempt to apply full WLTP testing to single vehicle approval seems irrational and impractical and to defeat the object of the IVA. 14. What other views do you have on the emission rules for light vehicle converters? Where vehicles being converted are not new, or do not use new engine technology, emissions rules should not be retrospectively applied. Instead, the rules prevailing at the time of the engine's production should be applied. This is what is done now and has been the case for many years. The numbers of vehicles involved are very small and environmental consequences therefore minimal. 15. Do you agree with requiring kit cars submitted for IVA to meet the latest MOT standards, thereby removing the rule that kit cars are IVA tested to MOT standards according to engine age? · Yes · No Your reasons are? The definition of "kit car" is unclear and as with other terminology used, does not match DVLA definitions. - It could include professionally manufactured, very small production volume vehicles made from new components. In this case, testing to prevailing MoT standards would be reasonable. - It could mean amateur build vehicles using a mixture of new and recycled parts, including, in the interests of cost and simplicity, older engines not designed to pass those standards. It should be recognised that in many cases the builders are not seeking to "subvert" emissions rules but just to keep their projects within their financial and technical means. It should also be recognised that while 90s engine management technology is relatively easy to re-purpose, from the early 2000s onwards, the complexity of these systems and their integration with other vehicle systems makes re-purposing very much harder, if not impossible. Therefore to blandly state "The majority of the fleet is now vehicles up to 25 years old whose engines are fitted with catalytic converters, providing plenty of choice to the kit car builder." demonstrates a lack of understanding of the reality. - It could mean "radically altered vehicles" though not mentioned as such in the consultation document, unless this is what is meant by "reconstructed (restored) classics" (which by DVLA terminology are not subject to IVA). Remarks made under amateur build also apply here. - Reconstructed (restored) Classic. Not sure what is meant by this terminology as vehicles so defined by the DVLA are not current required to undergo IVA unless sufficiently modified to count as "radically altered". It should be understood that, with the exception of professionally built kit cars, these vehicles will be "one-offs" and even if all the above suggested groupings are taken together, total numbers registered per year will be very small. These vehicles also tend to cover very low annual mileages so any environmental benefit gained from these measures will be minimal. Against this, the effects on peoples leisure pursuits/hobbies and, in some cases, livelihoods will be profound and destructive. The UK has a long history of reasonably "light touch" regulation allowing a thriving culture of car enthusiasts building and modifying their own cars. As well as providing a leisure pursuit for tens of thousands of people, it also helps support many small and medium size businesses adding up to a considerable annual turnover and thus government tax revenue. Some elements of the proposed legislation amount to an effective ban on some parts of this and will cause serious damage - with minimal environmental gains to justify it. A further concern is that the writers of the consultation document do not appear to fully understand current regulations or terminology relating to these groups of vehicles, let alone the potential consequences of their proposals. 43. Any other comments on anything in this consultation or relevant to national approval schemes? Why the unseemly haste? Why is this consultation open for just 4 weeks when government guidelines clearly state a 12 week recommended minimum (unless clear reasons are stated for the need for a short timescale) Do you not want people to comment? Are you afraid of the answers? Are you afraid that Brexit will mean you are no longer able to blame unpopular legislation on the EU? The proposed timescale means that changes could be implemented in law 7 months from first appearance of the consultation. For some of the people affected by this, that is well within the lifetime of a project and could have serious practical and financial consequences. It is a concern is that the writers of the consultation document do not appear to fully understand current regulations or DVLA terminology relating to kit cars, radically modified vehicles and reconstructed (restored) classics, let alone the potential consequences of their proposals on the amateur enthusiast and the businesses that support them. The UK has a long history of reasonably "light touch" regulation allowing a thriving culture of car enthusiasts building and modifying their own cars. As well as providing a leisure pursuit for tens of thousands of people, it also helps support many small and medium size businesses adding up to a considerable annual turnover and thus government tax revenue. Some elements of the proposed legislation amount to an effective ban on some parts of this and will cause serious damage - with minimal environmental gains to justify it. Further, there appears to have been no attempt to notify clubs and business associations who would be seriously affected by these proposals. Together with the short consultation period, this looks at worst, like deliberate intent to exclude, or at best, shoddy government. Britain deserves better.
  5. Vitessesteve

    Hi Steve, Welcome Your document sharing/hosting has been appreciated by many, for many years now - myself included! Welcome indeed Nick
  6. Name: Hamish Category: Vehicles Date Added: 2018-02-24 Submitter: Hamish Hamish
  7. TR3a

    TR3a
  8. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    John If you get stuck and as I'm probably a few weeks away from fitting my MJ, if you need to borrow my Edis unit let me know Alan
  9. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    Hello John Faulty Edits unit? I do not know how you test them! I could probably find you some resistors when I get home (I have a large selection from the late father in law and messing with odd circuits etc) Roger Ps or still duff wiring?
  10. Latest little project

    The secret is to support both sides of the steel as you form it. I had my sheet steel sandwiched in between the 2 28mm formers in an enormous vice.
  11. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    Yes it looks like the sensor is probably OK John. The peaks may well be ten times as large as your meter says. Rob
  12. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    No, Rob, I set it to DC. And - DOH! - of course the output isn't DC but AC! With the meter set to AC and the 200V range I get a constant 1.3V! So the peaks are probably a bit more than that? And the resistance is about 200 Ohms. That corrects the dud-sensor diagnosis, I presume? I don't need to find another, but that leaves me with no solutions to the lack of spark when the engine turns over. Borrocks. John
  13. Vitessesteve

    I have a website: http://vitessesteve.co.uk where I have been sharing Triumph related documents for years. My current Triumph related project is about Standard Triumph car dealers: I have a facebook page for that project: https://www.facebook.com/TriumphCarDealers/ and a blog at: http://vitessesteve.blogspot.co.uk/ Own a Vitesse Mk2 and a TR7 with Sprint engine in it.
  14. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    A VR (variable reluctance) sensor is basically just a coil would round a magnet. Very little to go wrong and you can can do a basic check easily by measuring for coil resistance between the connector pins. In your test you may be being fooled by your multimeter - I guess its a digital one which you have set on AC volts? The output of the sensor will be spikes which the multimeter cannot handle properly because it is calibrated for sine-waves. It is probably reading the average of the spikes which will be quite low. You really need an oscilloscope for that test. Rob The 'sort of' sinewaves shown on the TriggerWheel site are at 10000rpm where everything has smoothed out due to time-constants. At 160 rpm the waveform won't look like that at all.
  15. Just posting this from a PM thread as it may be of general interest, and others may also have insight/comments Alan oldtuckunder Replied: 5 hours ago Hi John Just playing with rockers and had a question you may be able to answer. The standard Triumph rockers have a hole drilled between the rocker arm and the journal that runs on the shaft, so that a little dribble of oil is fed to the rocker tip to I guess 1) Lubricate the tip to valve stem contact, and I guess also apply a dribble of lubrication to the spring assy and the the valve stem. Looking at other cast rockers like mini ones they don't seem to have this feature. I think I picked up that you are now using roller rocker arms? do they have a feed from the bushing to the tip/roller assy? or do they rely on way more oil being fed to the whole rocker box area to compensate. Alan JohnD Replied: 4 hours ago Alan, That oil feed to the rocker journal is all there is. No further drilling out to the tip, which is - must be! - lubricated by splash. I belive that there are some roller rockers that provide an oil passage, but in this example, it just catches splash i the open top and allows it to seep down onto the roller, which is otherwise covered. http://www.jegs.com/p/COMP-Cams/Comp-Cams-Ultra-Gold-ARC-Aluminum-Rocker-Arms/955190/10002/-1 My rollers are Titans, that also shroud the roller, but AFAIK they rely on splash. oldtuckunder Replied: 4 hours ago Interesting! I'm tempted to say what splash with the standard triumph oil feed to the rocker shaft, which in my experience is just a nice positive dribble sufficient to do the job, unless an external oil feed is added when yes the rocker chamber does seem to get flooded. The tip feed in the Triumph Rocker is interesting in that I haven't seen it in other common engine rockers like Mini, Ford, MG I wonder if they all had higher oil feed volumes to the rocker assy? Alan JohnD Replied: 2 hours ago "tip feed"? Do the ones I sent you, or the ones yu have fitted, have a drilling out to the tip? I've had a look at Mini sites, and they rely on splash, the originals anyway. This video of a very similar Ford arrangement shows a small drilling in the rocker hub, that leaks oil onto the side of the rocker arm, in the hope that it will splash out onto the valve stem , I think. On the evidence of that film, and the oil sitting on the spring caps, it works, mostly, but not on No.3 valve (from the right)! And a massive flow of oil out of the rocker beraings and dow the floor of the gallery. Is that what you mean? I don't think Triumph's have those, do they? JOhn oldtuckunder Replied: 1 hour ago Wow what a strange world we live in. Its not what you know that is dangerous its what you think you know. I was always certain that from the MK1 Vitesse onwards all the Triumph engines used the same rockers, and I'm right but wrong. So I popped out the garage to take a picture of your rocker shaft with the feed holes in the rockers, and as you see below it doesn't have any! So dug out a Spitfire 1500 one and as below it does, almost similar to mine except on mine the hole is about 10mm further towards the tip So a quick check on Rimmers shows that yes I was correct all the engines used the same rockers, and their picture shows one with a feed hole. https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-109023 So as mine is an early engine and the Spitfire 1500 is a late one, and I guess yours is middle period, all I can assume is that they used to make them with feed holes, then they stopped (reduced cost?) and then they started using them again (maybe because of problems). Or the rockers on your shaft come from a non OE source that didn't drill them, but they look genuine. I can understand why they may have moved the hole back a bit between mine and the 1500, easier drilling and maybe slightly stronger. However I can say I like the idea of that feed hole as it does encourage lubrication to run down to that rocker tip. Wish I'd started this as a thread rather than PM to see what others know, however I thought it was a simple question if they did the same thing on the roller rockers? Alan JohnD Replied: 26 minutes ago As I know from my frequent urgent conference calls to Sideways, just talking about a problem frees it up! Either it starts new ideas in your mind or you get new information from others. See my posts this PM about Trigger Wheels to prove it! Your researches have revealed a facet - a hole! - in our knowledge of Triumph rockers. I'm sure you could just copy and paste this thread into one on the general board, and I'd say do it, to publish this newly discovered fact. AS to why the holes were there at first then not, then back again, I'm sure that it was production managment accountants - or just Sir John Black, the old skinflint, who was always keen not to spend money. John
  16. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    A VR (variable reluctance) sensor is basically just a coil would round a magnet. Very little to go wrong and you can can do a basic check easily by measuring for coil resistance between the connector pins. In your test you may be being fooled by your multimeter - I guess its a digital one which you have set on AC volts? The output of the sensor will be spikes which the multimeter cannot handle properly because it is calibrated for sine-waves. It is probably reading the average of the spikes which will be quite low. You really need an oscilloscope for that test. Rob
  17. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    As far as I could discover most VR sensors have the same electrical characteristics and variations are mostly in the overall shape, mounting arrangements and socket type. Pretty sure the sensor I use is from a Ford that doesn't actually have EDIS. 3 wire sensors will be Hall effect and won't work. The real Ford sensors are very tough and long-lived. The aftermarket ones, not so much. Good idea to carry a spare as they are show-stoppers. Nick
  18. Latest little project

    Whenever i try something like that the metal buckles up, so well done top job.
  19. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    OK! Spare trigger wheel in lathe, going at about 160rpm. I put the sensor into the tool holder, and wound it so close to the teeth that I could feel the vibration of their attraction. Any closer and its slight (very) non-centricity scraped the tip. Multimeter attached to the terminals. NOTHING! Or at best a flicker, so I turned it from the 20V range to the 200mVolt - and there's a reading! But it varies between 3 and 6 MILLIvolts. Quite variable, but that might be the ever so slightly non-centric trigger wheel. That says to me, duff sensor. If TriggerWheels expect between 3 and 100V at 18 and 10K rpm, on 3" wheel. This one is about 5" and I don't suppose it's linear, but at 160rpm surely its going to be around 160/18 times 3 or about 27V? Or at least more than MILLIvolts ! Which surprises me, as I thought that inductance sensors were as tough as old boots. So, do the assembled Faculty of Electrical Engineering agree that it's new sensor time? If this is the case, then I'm mightily relieved to have found the fault. My thanks to you all! John PS TriggerWheels site lists the right sensor, but the ordering page isn't working. Borrocks. Lots of Ford crank sensors for sale online, none with the same connection. Further research finds that what I have is a PC19 sensor, from a '91-96 Escort (and maybe other models?) and the only other I can find is in the US and will cost me £10.70. Plus a minimum of £17 postage!!!!!!!!!!! (and probably VAT and import Duty!) I'll go on looking. J.
  20. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    Right, checked the wiring to the sensor, it has the correct polarity, positive terminal to terminal No.6 on EDIS. I've checked the gap between sensor and wheel and it's less than 1mm. AND - thanks, Nick! - a needle into the next wire into the coil pack, earthed, gets a spark! There was a bigger one at the needle, but a definite spark. and I've connected the plug leads as below. Could the sensor be faulty? Roger, you put a trigger wheel on your lathe to test a sensor - how did you see the output? Multimeter or oscilloscope? And I'm trying this without the MJLJ connected, to remove complcation and as I read that the EDIS has its own "get-u-home" built-in map, that runs at a fixed 10 degres BTDC, that will allow this. John PS I'd go to the Horse's Mouth at Autosport Labs, that has forums, but I can't get in for some reason. It tells me that my email address is already registered, but my password doesn't work and if I tell I've forgotten it, it never sends me a new one! J PPS Just found this page at Trigger Wheels. Testing the wheel (to see how fast it can safely spin) and I'm reminded that the voltage from the sensor depends directly on the wheel speed. http://trigger-wheels.com/store/contents/en-uk/d25.html Theirs was 100V (!!) at 10K, although only 3V at 18rpm. That should be readable with a multimeter! Off to try it! J
  21. Trigger Wheel Mounting Vitesse

    Thanks, Rob - unfortunately on sucha a small cheap item, you have to go to the store to get it - they won't deliver, and my nearest is 25 miles away. I'll get ther one day. Roy, you installation very like mine. Nick, I bought the MJLJ ready wired. There is a sheilded lead to the sensor, ready to plug in, and it'll onky go one way. It could beb the wrong way around I suppose. I'll try eartahing the other three wires and see what happens. Suppose I'll need a needle probe to ge though the plastic. Roger, yes the coil pack is earthed. Doug, I'm using NGK Iridium plugs. Are they "resistor" plugs? John
  22. 1966 Vespa 150 Super

    Went and made a few bits to help solve this on Alan’s mill today. Then I clocked up and milled out a spare clutch cover ready for a much needed bigger clutch
  23. Wanted Triumph 2000/2.5

    Euugggh! My concern on that car is not what can be seen...... (which is scary enough) but what will be found when given a proper poking-at........ Might not be left with much! Nick
  24. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Triumph-2500s-estate-very-rare/222847327144?hash=item33e2bc5ba8:g:-8YAAOSwUiJai1pU Just to make sure, I had a look this estate this morning. Far too much body required for my liking sills, screen surround, door bottoms, wheel arches etc. Also, no fuel inlet system.
  25. Wanted Triumph 2000/2.5

    Think the vendor needs a reality check. It is a nice basis for a light resto to sort the iffy bits of bodywork properly (not "MoT standard" plates & pigeon poo welding) - then £ 7k. It's a late car and lowish spec - the only thing it's really got going for it is the "low mileage", if verifiable, and all that probably means is it's done the miles the hard way - in 5 mile bursts, with the choke out. Try to use it daily and you'll spend 6 to 9 months getting the bugs out and they won't all be minor either. Nick
  26. What's happening over on CT?

    Your old mate Emile Mercier liked "shrudlu" omn the linotype machine, often used it in his cartoons:
  27. First Visit

    Yeah, the British Anti Rust system has a lot going for it....Even here in New Zealand. Tony.
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