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    :)

    As consumers learn more about the importance of sustainable living, more homeowners are turning their attention to eco-friendly projects for their homes. As demand increases so does supply and there are many in the construction industry seeking for eco-friendly solutions to help consumers live sustainably. One of these solutions which has been growing in popularity is metal roofing.

     

    The rise of metal roofing

    When you look at all the benefits of metal roofing, its easy to see why it's become so much more commonplace in America. Metal roofs are some of the most durable roofs you can find. They can withstand the most fierce weather including heavy rain, snow, hail, and strong winds. In addition to holding up against the weather, they're impervious to other things that threaten most roofs such as fire and pests. Because they are so durable and easy to maintain, they benefit the environment in a number of ways.

     

    Energy efficiency

    One of the major ways that metal roofs can help the environment is by saving energy. Metal roofs are considered cool roofs because they reflect the suns rays back up into the atmosphere rather than absorbing them like dark roofs (such as asphalt shingle roofs) do. According to a study on different roofing materials at the Oak Ridge National Labratory, cool metal roofing was the most effective at reflecting sunlight. The research also suggests that cool metal roofs could even lower the ambient temperature in urban areas by reducing the urban heat island effect. In warmer climates, metal roofing can be a huge advantage because not only do they lower cooling costs, but they are conserving that energy to be used elsewhere.

     

    Longevity

    When a roof is replaced, most homeowners don't give a thought to what happens to their old roof. Usually, the old roof ends up in a landfill. The more often a roof needs to be replaced, the more waste that's going into landfills. Another major advantage to metal roofing is that it can last 2-3 times longer than an asphalt shingle roof. That means 2-3 times less waste. Combine that with the fact that metal roofs require very little in the way of maintenance and you begin to see why so many homeowners are beginning to switch to metal roofing.

     

    Recyclability

    Of course no roof lasts forever and even a metal roof will need to be replaced eventually. Unlike other roofing materials that usually end up in a landfill, metal roofs are highly recyclable. Most metal roofs already consist of up to 40% recyclable materials to begin with. But 100% of the metal roof can be recycled once the roof is replaced. That means that old roof can be turned into a new roof for someone else or into something else. Where it won't end up is in a landfill.

     

    Home improvement news brought to you by bartonroof.com

    Source: triplepundit.com/2014/08/metal-roofing-unlikely-way-reduce-waste-save-energy/

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    Steve's Vit6
    Latest Entry

    Just some piccies taken by a previous owner now about 2 and a bit years old.blogentry-1800-0-10692300-1359575106.jpgblogentry-1800-0-81665100-1359575115.jpgblogentry-1800-0-47857600-1359575132.jpg

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    This one takes me to the studio in a grand old soviet style concert hall.

     

    Russian trams take many shapes and sizes, most of them dating from 40 years or so ago.

    They only ever get stopped by the odd car that is stupid enough to get in the way.

     

    (saw one the other day,a demolished brand new BMW. Unfortunately it blocks the trams solid for hrs while the insurers arrive in true bureaucratic russian style)

     

    They have a great way of warming up the most important parts.

    Now why couldn't the British think of that?

    blogentry-701-0-29703700-1359312630.jpg

     

    Life inside, while frosty patterns form on the inside of the windows.

    blogentry-701-0-18232700-1359312763.jpg

     

    She's as ugly as the back end of a bus, or in this case a tram.

    blogentry-701-0-75940900-1359312922.jpg

     

    This is a Volga. They refuse to die or get damaged by russian roads.

    blogentry-701-0-29506500-1359312981.jpg

     

    The view from outside the concert hall

    blogentry-701-0-34939500-1359313122.jpg

     

    No-one would ever pretend, in the Soviet Union they didn't do things without a sense of style especially inside.

    blogentry-701-0-28914700-1359313039.jpg

     

    Where I spend the next 5hrs or so working or trying to practice.

    blogentry-701-0-43836800-1359313353.jpg

     

    I have never been so relieved as to catch this one back....-20C with a wind & 40 minutes wait!

    Brrrr

     

    blogentry-701-0-93492100-1359313526.jpg

     

    This is the result of living in a "developing" country.

    Some things develop from time to time, some don't.

     

    Here the new generation tram, with old generation prices....28p to go any distance.

    Now there's an idea for London Boris!

     

    blogentry-701-0-06100800-1359313820.jpg

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    mrjpgray
    Latest Entry

    Fuel Rail Question...

     

    So I'm in the middle of getting all the parts together to replace the Lucas Mechanical PI system on my car to a modern EFI system, more for reliability, ease of tuning and saving petrol than there being anything wrong with the current set up, and I have a question re the fueling.

     

    I have the shiney new fuel rail ready to drill out and I was wondering if I need a pressure relief valve on the end of the fuel rail to keep fuel in the rail supplying the injectors or not? This question has arisen out of when I purchased a set of Bosch injectors from a BMW the fuel rail has one on the end. I have an adjustable fuel regulator mounted on the bulk head to ensure the fuel entering the rail is at the correct pressure from the pump but wasn't sure about fitting a PRV at the other end or not?

     

    Cheers,

     

    Jason.

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    finally I managed to get some things fixed on the racer:

     

    - The silencer is modified to fit and in place. A custom big box (oval with 262x116 mm, with 350mm length to fit under the trunk) with some additional tweaks. I hope it meets Zandvoort noise restrictions without further mods required.

     

    - I switched from rubber engine mounts to PU engine mounts. Shore 70. Not much engine movement left at the moment. I'm curious how long they will last or if the metal-PU bonding will detach.

     

    The next step: doing a nice conversion for the front coilovers to shorter shocks so I'm not constantly running on the bump stops...

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    Thought id be the first to start a blog.

     

    With regards to the car, not much is happening, focus has changed. Car is going to be made as std racing spec as possible, classic race series is out my budget but if i make it stock performance i should be able to manage a hillclimb or two a year.

     

    I got the all clear from the hospital yesterday, leg is now at 95% strength after 7 months of healing, however it still needs some work. As such a race licence is a no go for 12 months until the give me the 100% status. More importantly i've been banned from snowboarding for another year and a half which is just shit.

     

    Job situation may change things once again, if i do get formally offered the new job everything will change again, i cant take the car with me so it will end up going into storage.

     

    So all in big changes ahead.

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  • Recent Posts

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